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NEWSPAPER MACHINES BEING BROKEN INTO AROUND HENDERSONVILLE

NEWSPAPER MACHINES BEING BROKEN INTO AROUND HENDERSONVILLE

 

The Hendersonville Police Department says it's investigating a series of breaking and entering incidents reported at many newspaper coin-operated boxes on the north and west sides of the city.

As of mid-week, nine boxes were reported to be broken into, said Capt. Bruce Simonds with HPD.

The suspect appears to be breaking into machines belonging to the Times-News and the Hendersonville Lightning using bolt cutters, Simonds said.

Boxes have been broken into at the Post Office and Economy Drugs on Fifth Avenue West as well as Burger King and Joey's Bagels on Asheville Highway.

Officers have received a tip regarding the incidents. And they' ve began checking machines around 8 p.m. at night and were inspecting boxes until around 2 a.m. in the mornings, Simonds said.

So far, police have no suspects.

 

SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT ADDS NEW K-9'S

SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT ADDS NEW K-9'S

 

 The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office is getting some extra help in tracking suspects.

Two 10-week-old, female bloodhound puppies are joining the department and will be trained to locate missing people and to track suspects, according to a news release from Henderson County.

Officials have asked fifth-graders in the county’s STAR or Sheriff Teaching Abuse Resistance program to suggest names for the two new additions. The winning names will be announced in early February.

The students with the winning entries and their classmates will have the opportunity to meet the dog they named at a special presentation.

 

HENDERSON COUNTY NEEDS POLL WORKERS FOR THE MARCH 15TH PRIMARY ELECTION

HENDERSON COUNTY NEEDS POLL WORKERS FOR THE MARCH 15TH PRIMARY ELECTION

 

Elections director Beverly Cunningham says the Henderson County Board of Elections is looking for poll workers for the upcoming primary election on March 15, the board announced in a release Friday titled “Voters Needed. Poll Workers Even More So.”

Each countywide election takes several hundred poll workers, who are required to open and close the polls, issue ballots, set up voting machines and keep track of who has voted.

The release says potential poll workers must be 18 years old and registered to vote, must be able to speak, read and write fluently, have strong clerical skills, able to solve problems, be an effective communicator and work with the public, and cannot be a candidate for any office to be voted on at the polling place at that election.

Training is required for each election official, who can earn from $150 to $175 per day. Officials will also be paid for training.

Many 17- and 18-year-olds also work as poll workers on Election Day, and are also paid for working and training.

Students that are 18 are registered to vote, but 17-year-olds are not, the release says. Students’ parent and school officials must also sign off on the approval of a student working on Election Day, and if approved, students earn $150 plus training.

Training begins in February and “citizen involvement is essential to conduct open, accurate and fair elections in North Carolina,” according to the release.

For more information, contact Karen Hebb or Beverly Cunningham at the Board of Elections at 697-4970. For applications to be an election official, visitwww.hendersoncountync.org/elections/precinctoffapp.pdf and for student applications, visit www.hendersoncountync.org/elections/studentapp.pdf.

 

 

SHERIFF REMINDS PET OWNERS OF RABIES DANGER

SHERIFF REMINDS PET OWNERS OF RABIES DANGER

 

The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office Animal Enforcement division has an important message for all pet owners: Make sure your pets’ rabies vaccinations are up to date.   
 
“We are lucky to have a lot of wildlife in Henderson County,” said Corporal Vince Griggs, “but if your dog gets bit by a wild animal, and the dog’s shots aren’t up to date, you don’t have many options.  Either the dog has to be quarantined in an approved facility for six months or it has to be euthanized.  We don’t want to see that happen.”
 
Rabies is typically spread via the saliva of infected animals through bite wounds, but it has been known to spread through scratches or existing wounds.  There is no treatment for the deadly disease.  The most common animals to carry the disease are raccoons, bats, skunks and foxes.  Even indoor pets should be immunized.  
 
If you are unsure about your pet’s vaccinations (including rabies, distemper and parvo) or if your pet seems sick or injured from an unknown cause, contact your veterinarian immediately.  State law requires all dogs and cats over the age of 4 months to be vaccinated.  If you fail to have current rabies vaccinations in Henderson County, you can be fined $100 per day.
 
There are low cost options to ensure your pet is safe.  Rabies vaccination clinics sponsored by Henderson County Animal Services and Henderson County Veterinarians will be occurring later this year.  Clinics will be held at participating veterinarian’s offices by appointment only for a reduced fee of $8.00 per cat or dog.  The clinic for cats will occur the week of March 7-March 12 and the dog clinic will occur May 2-May 7.
 
“Please get your pets vaccinated,” said Corporal Griggs.  “We can’t stress it enough.”
 

 

PUBLIX SUPERMARKET AND NEW "SOUTH MARKET VILLAGE" ON HENDERSONVILLE'S SOUTH SIDE APPROVED BY CITY COUNCIL

PUBLIX SUPERMARKET AND NEW "SOUTH MARKET VILLAGE" ON HENDERSONVILLE'S SOUTH SIDE APPROVED BY CITY COUNCIL

 

A public hearing and then a vote Thursday night means a Publix Super Market is coming to Hendersonville.

The city council and the community at that meeting all seemed excited about the South Market Village project.

 

Council members voted unanimously to approve a special use permit to rezone a nearly 7-acre piece of land in order to build a new Publix.

It's located at the intersection of White Street and Greenville Highway.

 

Possibly widening White Street to three lanes isn't something DOT can do for another 6 years to alleviate traffic problems.

Another concern on the south side of Hendersonville is flooding since it's the lowest point in the city.

 

One man who owns property along Greenville Highway spoke up about a plan that the council is now taking into consideration. It involves what to do with the 12 acres of city-owned land next-door to what will be the South Market Village.

 

"Engineer that stream so when it starts filling up, it'll bleed off into that detention pond. That would help solve the flooding problems in that area tremendously," a nearby property owner said. "In fact, it might even eliminate some of those small floods."

 

The developer has also taken note of that local flooding issue and plans to elevate that property.

 

"The retaining walls will be around the perimeter of the cite to retain that additional fill, so you're existing grade is relatively uniform," Eric Hampton, a project manager, said. "We're bringing fill in, so you're going to have that retaining wall on the property edge."

No one spoke against this project during the public hearing.

 

VOLATILITY PREDICTED FOR LOCAL GAS PRICES IN 2016

VOLATILITY PREDICTED FOR LOCAL GAS PRICES IN 2016

Volatility is a given for any gasoline price forecast as unpredictable geopolitical issues arise, as well as refinery outages and problems, and weather impacts production of products, and this year, GasBuddy forecasts several periods of significant volatility.

With OPEC’s failure to address over production and falling oil prices, there remains a question of how long OPEC and its members will stay this course. Additionally, new Saudi/Iran tensions and an agreement with Iran to ease sanctions in exchange for throttling back nuclear ambitions may unexpectedly shift during the year.

Refinery maintenance season and a shift back to EPA mandated cleaner burning gasoline during the late winter and early spring generally culminates in an increase of 35-75 cents per gallon in gasoline prices. In a typical year, there are several unexpected problems that arise during complex turnarounds that refineries conduct. The West Coast and Great Lakes states are most susceptible to price shocks if unexpected issues arise during maintenance seasons.

While the U.S. escaped major hurricanes last year, hurricane season has brought significant harm to oil infrastructure in the last decade, and while hurricanes are not guaranteed to impact such facilities, such an event could interrupt notable infrastructure and drive up gasoline and other refined product prices. Gasoline taxes are being evaluated in several states.

In addition, the federal government may look at increasing taxes on gasoline, something it hasn’t done since 1993. Several states have already raised prices with the New Year, and several other states are identifying best methods to raise funding for road repairs- any new taxes will push prices higher than expected. The current low cost environment of gasoline makes raising taxes an attractive option for cash-strapped states.

WINNING POWERBALL TICKET SOLD AT MILLS RIVER QUIK MART

WINNING POWERBALL TICKET SOLD AT MILLS RIVER QUIK MART

 

No one won the estimated $500 million Powerball jackpot Wednesday, but one of the $50,000 winning tickets was sold in Mills River.

A customer bought the ticket at Quik Mart on Cross Road Drive, and while the manager says he doesn't know who bought it, he's got at least one customer in mind - an elderly woman - that he hopes is the winner.

Andy Ward, who's managed the Quik Mart for more than eight years, said many people have been in and out of the store buying lottery tickets as the jackpot continues to climb.

Ward hopes whoever did buy it will come and tell him. To win the $50,000 prize, a ticket holder must match four of the five numbers drawn and the Powerball. The odds for the prize are 1 in 913,129.18.

He encourages every customer to buy a ticket and saw as many as 300 customers buy tickets on Thursday, saying he expects Saturday to be a "very, very busy day."

Ward has sold a $50,000 winning ticket before, a $2 scratch-off he sold about five months ago, he said.

The store was one seven in the state to sell winning $50,000 tickets.

 

BLUE RIDGE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES MAKES LEADERSHIP CHANGES

BLUE RIDGE COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES MAKES LEADERSHIP CHANGES

 

The Board of Directors of Blue Ridge Community Health Services, Inc. (BRCHS) announced today that the non-profit will begin implementing a succession plan developed as part of the strategic planning process earlier this year where the current BRCHS Chief Executive Officer, Jennifer Henderson, will transition from CEO to a senior role in Business Development.  As ofApril 1, 2016, Richard Hudspeth, M.D., who currently serves as the BRCHS Chief Medical Officer, will be the new CEO at BRCHS. 

 

Cindy Pierce, BRCHS Board Chair said that the board of directors formally began succession planning as part of updating the strategic plan earlier this year.  “We realized that succession planning played an essential role in our strategic plan,” said Ms. Pierce.  “During the process, we also identified the organization’s need for an even greater emphasis on business development activities,” said Ms. Pierce.“  Given the growth already established under her leadership, Jennifer requested to move from CEO into a role solely focused on new ventures, expanded services, affiliations and partnerships.  The board then worked closely with Jennifer and BRCHS Leadership to identify her best possible executive successor,” said Pierce. 

 

Since Henderson joined the organization as CEO, the non-profit health center has experienced dramatic growth from serving 10,000 patients in two locations in 2007, to serving over 40,000 active patients in 13 locations across western North Carolina in 2015.

 

Pierce believes that the current leadership team is well positioned to continue that success under the leadership of Dr. Hudspeth.  “Richard brings strong physician leadership skills to his new role.  During his short time with BRCHS as CMO, he has already demonstrated his commitment to our patients, mission and quality.  He has quickly become a valuable member of a strong leadership team that works exceptionally well together.  We look forward to what his leadership will bring as CEO.” 

 

Pleased with the succession planning process, Henderson remarked, “I’m confident that BRCHS has the right people in the right places to position BRCHS well for the future.

 

Dr. Hudspeth has served as the Chief Medical Officer since May of this past year, and served on the BRCHS medical staff since June 2013.  He has been practicing in Henderson County as faculty in the MAHEC Hendersonville Family Practice Residency program at Hendersonville Family Health Center, as well as at the Henderson County Health Department and Pardee Hospital for over 10 years.  Prior to assuming the position of CMO, Dr. Hudspeth served as the Medical Director for Community Care of Western North Carolina.  He received his undergraduate degree from Duke University and his medical degree from The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.  He did an obstetrics fellowship at The University of Utah in Salt Lake City, where he practiced in a community health center before returning to North Carolina.

 

BRCHS is a non-profit community health center that has been providing high quality and affordable medical, dental and mental health care as well as promoting health awareness/education for over 50 years.  Services are conveniently provided in Hendersonville, NC at Blue Ridge Health Center, Hendersonville Family Health Center; 7th Avenue Health Center; in Brevard, NC at Brevard Health Center; in Arden, NC at Arden Health Center; in Spindale, NC at Rutherford Health Center, in Columbus, NC at Polk Health Center, and in four Henderson County Public Schools.  If you would like more information about BRCHS services, call 692-4289; or visit www.brchs.com and www.facebook.com/BRCHS.

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HENDERSON COUNTY HISTORY CLASSES START JANUARY 12 AT BRCC

HENDERSON COUNTY HISTORY CLASSES START JANUARY 12 AT BRCC

 

Persons interested in the history and heritage of Henderson County are encouraged to register online now for the fall semester courses that begin Tuesday, Jan. 12, through the Continuing Education Department at Blue Ridge Community College. The classes are open to the public.

 

Classes are held on Tuesdays. There is a day class and a night class that cover the same material. The day class is 1 to 2:30 p.m. and the night class is 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Henderson County History and Heritage I, covering prehistory to 1860, is taught the first half of the semester from Jan. 12 to March 1.

 

Topics include geography and natural resources, Cherokee and Catawba history and culture, Revolutionary War and treaties with the Cherokee, early settlers and backgrounds, Appalachian culture, political and economic history, agriculture, transportation, religious history, education, early communities, black history, and noteworthy families and people in the early history of the county.

 

Registration is $60.

 

Henderson County History and Heritage II, covering 1860 to the early 20th century, takes place the second half of the semester, from March 15 to May 10. Topics include the Civil War, Reconstruction, black history, Appalachian culture and stereotypes, political and economic history, industry, agriculture, transportation, religious history, education, tourism, 19th and 20th century communities, and World War I. 

 

The iinstructor is Jennie Jones Giles.

 

To register online, visit http://www.blueridge.edu/ceregister Persons may also register from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays and 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Fridays beginning Jan. 4 at the Continuing Education Building, Room 123 or call 694-1735.

 

 

PARDEE PURCHASES PRIME LAND ON BOYLESTON HIGHWAY IN MILLS RIVER; PLANS TO EXPAND TO MEET THE HEALTH CARE NEEDS OF NORTHWESTERN HENDERSON COUNTY

PARDEE PURCHASES PRIME LAND ON BOYLESTON HIGHWAY IN MILLS RIVER; PLANS TO EXPAND TO MEET THE HEALTH CARE NEEDS OF NORTHWESTERN HENDERSON COUNTY

 

            Over the past few months, and as part of a larger endeavor to strategically plan for and accommodate patient growth and delivery of health care in Henderson County, Pardee Hospital has been exploring opportunities in the Mills River area of Henderson County. Just befoe the end of 2015,  Pardee closed on 20 plus acres in Mills River, directly across from the Ingles located at the corner of N. Mills River Road and Boylston Highway.  The property had been used for agriculture and was previously owned by the Moore family.

 

            “We see this as a positive move for Pardee and one that makes sense in reaching people in Etowah, Mills River, and Fletcher,” said James M. Kirby, II, President and CEO, Pardee Hospital. “This is part of a measured, strategic approach to planning for the health care needs of our community. We have worked with business and industry, listened to our patients, and heard from keaders in the town nd from residents within our county that more convenient access to high quality health care in that area of the county is a growing concern.”  

 

            Before Pardee closed on the property, the Town Council of Mills River, at the seller's reques, rezoned the property from Neighborhood Commercial to General Business. That change in zoning removes a lot of limits in what Pardee may build on the property.

 

            And CEO Kirby noted that the hospital plans to take its time in finalizing plans for the property, and will remain flexible in determining exact needs of the Mills River community anbd will plans facilities and services on that site according to the need, while working with the Town and staying within the zoning requirements.

 

            Reports are that Pardee has been looking at property in the Mills River area during most of 2015, with an eye toward expanding into the growing industrial and commercial, as sell as agricultural and residential, Town of Mills River.