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SCHOOL BOARD VOTES TO SAVE HHS MAIN BUILDING

SCHOOL BOARD VOTES TO SAVE HHS MAIN BUILDING

In a split 4 to 3 vote the county school.board has voted to reccoment to the county commissioners that the current Hendersonville High School faclity be saved and used for clsssrooms...and the school board recommends replacing the two gyms and other structures on the campus.

The facility dates back to 1926...snd the school board and county commissioners are looking at upgrading and replacement costs of between 50 and 60 million dollars.

HHS is one of three major county school projects being planned by the school board and commissioners.

 

 

SHERIFF REQUESTS PUBLIC'S HELP IN VEHICLE BREAK-INS

SHERIFF REQUESTS PUBLIC'S HELP IN VEHICLE BREAK-INS

The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office is requesting the public’s assistance in identifying the persons or vehicle from the below listed photographs.

Detectives are investigating several motor vehicle break-ins around the areas of South Rugby Road, North Rugby Road, North Hills and Alpine Drive.

The vehicle pictured was occupied with 3 persons and appears to have front end damage with part the front bumper missing. The center caps on the wheels are missing and it has a rear spoiler. Should anyone have any information please contact CID Detective, Corporal Darrin Whitaker at 828-694-3098.

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

CITY COUNCIL:  STILL NO FINAL DECISION ON COUNCIL MEMBERS CARRYING WEAPONS

CITY COUNCIL: STILL NO FINAL DECISION ON COUNCIL MEMBERS CARRYING WEAPONS

Hendersonville City Council Thursday night turned the whole issue of council members, the city manager, city attorney, and city clerk being allowed to carry weapons on city property over to city staff…for further research.

Three members of city council have been in favor of an exemption that would allow them to carry weapons since the whole issue came up a few months ago…but in this case, a simple three vote majority would not be enough to make it happen…and Mayor Barbara Volk and Council member Jerry Smith are opposed to it. Members Stephens, Miller, and Caraker have favored it. Caraker had an actual vote on the issue taken off the agenda this week…and in a discussion of the issue, city staff was directed to develop what they call a more comprehensive weapons safety plan.

Look for things to move forward now with what’s being called Eastside Meadows. City council has approved a density exceptions, and special use permit, and zoning changes to start developing 21 acrers on North Main Street into 206 housing units.

Council points out this will help meet the need here for more affordable housing.

A WORLD PREMIER--CHASING RAiNBOWS:  THE ROAD TO OZ OPENS NOV. 27 AT FRP

A WORLD PREMIER--CHASING RAiNBOWS: THE ROAD TO OZ OPENS NOV. 27 AT FRP

Flat Rock Playhouse, the developmental house for Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Oz, announced today the complete casting for the world premiere that chronicles the life of a young Judy Garland. This exciting new musical explores her extraordinary journey from vaudeville to Hollywood to stardom which culminated in one of the most popular films of all time, The Wizard of OzThe production will run from November 27 through December 19, 2015 at Flat Rock Playhouse, the State Theatre of North Carolina, nestled in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The cast for Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Oz includes Ruby Rakos (Broadway’s Billy Elliot) in the central role of Frances Gumm who eventually blossoms into the legendary Judy Garland. Other principal roles will be played by Ben Crawford (Broadway’s On the Twentieth Century, Big Fish, Shrek the Musical, Les Miserables), Michael Wartella (Broadway’s Wicked), Windi Bergamini, Michael McCorry Rose (Broadway’s A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, Wicked), Janet Dickinson (Broadway’s Bullets Over Broadway, Dr. Suess’s how the Grinch Stole Christmas) and Kevin B. McGlynn.

The adult ensemble will comprise of Zach Berger, Katie Drinkard, Preston Dyar, Dan Higgins, Maddy Kinsella, Andrea Laxton, Katie LeMark, Sarah Primmer, Jack Sipple, Scott Treadway, Alexandria Van Paris, Davis Wayne and Zach Williams.

The producers and the creative team traveled to Flat Rock in August to audition local youth for Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Oz.  Featured roles include Kyra Hewitt as Baby Gumm, Nicole Johanson as Shirley Temple and Claire Griffin as Deanna Durbin.  Rounding out the youth ensemble will be Sophia Bradshaw, Anissa Gale-Patrizia Briggs, Harper Callahan, Brice Farris, Will Field, Keelie Jones Clarke MacDonald, Louise Martin, Ezekiel Mercado, Clancy Penny, Caroline Quinn, Jamie Riedy, Alisha Richardson, Hadin Robertson, Chris Saucedo, Ariana Schuler and Georgia Kay Wise.

Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Ozis conceived and produced by New York City based Tina Marie Casamento Libby, with a New York team of Executive Producer Nicole Kastrinos of Red Awning, and general management by 321 Theatrical ManagementThe tuner will feature such songs as “Over the Rainbow,” “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” and “Broadway Rhythm” which have been reconceived by Music Supervisor and Arranger David Libby in a revelatory, contemporary sound. In addition to signature Garland songs, Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Oz incorporates songs from the MGM era culled from the Sony Feist/Robbins Catalog, rights administered by Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC.

Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Oz is written by Marc Acito and will be directed and choreographed by Jeff Whiting.  Acito is the book writer of the musical Allegiance which opens November 2015 on Broadway.  Allegiance won the Craig Noel Award for Outstanding New Musical for its run at the Old Globe in San Diego.  Acito also won the Helen Hayes Award for Best New Play with his comedy Birds of a Feather, which has received six other productions.  Recently he wrote the concert adaptation of Lerner & Loewe's 1951 classic Paint Your Wagon for City Center's Encores series in New York.

Recently acclaimed as a 'director with a joyous touch' by the New York Times, Jeff Whiting is a director and choreographer for theater, opera, television, special events and concerts around the world. On Broadway, he was the Associate Director for the Broadway productions of Bullets Over Broadway, Big Fish, The Scottsboro Boys, Hair, Young Frankenstein and Wicked (5th Anniversary).  As a director, Whiting has helmed the national touring productions of Young Frankenstein and the upcoming Bullets Over Broadway and the Brazilian production of Hairspray.

The Flat Rock Playhouse Mainstage Series Sponsor is The Cliffs, the Opening Night Sponsor is BMW of Asheville and the local Executive Producer for this world premiere is Pardee Hospital.  The production is also supported by Bob and Charlotte Otto through the Flat Rock Playhouse New Works Initiative.

 

TICKETS AND SCHEDULE

Chasing Rainbows: The Road to Oz will run from November 27th through December 19th at the Flat Rock Playhouse.  Performances Thursday through Sunday at 8 PM.  Matinees Saturday at 2 PM. Tickets start at $25 and can be purchased by calling the Playhouse Box Office at 828-693-0731, toll-free at 866-732-8008 or online at www.flatrockplayhouse.org

MAYOR BOB STATON WINS DECISIVE VICTORY IN FLAT ROCK; CARAKER AND STEPHENS RE-ELECTED TO HENDERSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL

MAYOR BOB STATON WINS DECISIVE VICTORY IN FLAT ROCK; CARAKER AND STEPHENS RE-ELECTED TO HENDERSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL

NOVEMBER 3RD HENDERSON COUNTY MUNICIPAL ELECTION COVERAGE

THE EARLY ONE STOP VOTING ENDED LAST SATURDAY…AND ALL THE USUAL POLLING PLACES IN THE COUNTY OPENED UP FOR VOTING TUESDAY MORNING AT 6:30 AND CLOSED AT 7:30PM.

EVEN THOUGH THERE WERE ONLY TWO CONTESTED RACES IN HENDERSON COUNTY TUESDAY AND ONE IN SALUDA, HERE’S THE BREAK-DOWN

THE VILLAGE OF FLAT ROCK RE-ELECTED INCUMBENT MAYOR BOB STATON...HE RECEIVED 727 VOTES.  CHALLENGER BOB SPITZER RECEIVED 38 VOTES AND THERE WERE TWO WRITE-IN VOTES FOR.  MAYOR OF THE VILLAGE OF FLAT ROCK 

(Footnote:  Staton is a retired lawyer and was a WHKP staff member many years ago.  A former WHKP News Director, Emilie Swearingen, got 54 per cent of the vote Tuesday and was elected mayor of Kure Beach, North Carolina.)

NICK WEEDERMAN, GINGER BROWN, AND JOHN DOCKENDORF WERE ALL RE-ELECTED TO FLAT ROCK VILLAGE COUNCI ON TUESDAY…ALL WERE UNOPPOSED.

IN THE TOWN OF FLETCHER, COUNCIL MEMBERS HUGH CLARK AND BOB DAVY WERE RE-ELECTED. THEY ALSO WERE UNOPPOSED.

THE ONLY OTHER CONTESTED RACE IN THE COUNTY TUESDAY WAS FOR TWO SEATS ON HENDERSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL…AND INCUMBENTS STEVE CARAKER AND RON STEPHENS BOTH WON RE-ELECTION. CARAKER WAS THE TOP VOTE GETTER RECEIVING 485 VOTES; STEPHENS RECEIVED 428 VOTES; AND THEY WERE BEING CHALLENGED BY REBECCA SCHWARTZ WHO RECEIVED 308 VOTES. THE TOP TWO VOTE GETTERS, CARAKER AND STEPHENS, WON THAT ELECTION.

THE TOWN OF LAUREL PARK RE-ELECTED CAREY O’CAIN AS MAYOR TUESDAY WITH NO OPPOSITION. GEORGE BANTA AND ROBERT VICKERY WERE ELECTED TO LAUREL PARK TOWN COUNCIL…BOTH WERE UNOPPOSED.

AND IN THE TOWN OF MILLS RIVER…TWO COUNCIL MEMBERS WHO HAVE SERVED ON THE COUNCIL SINCE THE TOWN WAS CREATED 12 YEARS AGO WERE RE-ELECTED TUESDAY WITH NO OPPOSITION…THEY ARE WAYNE CARLAND AND ROGER SNYDER.

AND DOWN IN SALUDA…THREE PEOPLE WERE RUNNING FOR TWO CITY COMMISSIONER SEATS…THEY WERE KAREN BULTMAN, LEON MORGAN, AND STANLEY WALKER.  BULTMAN AND MORGAN GOT NO VOTES TUESDAY.  WALKER GOT 2 VOTES AND WRITE-IN CANDIDATE LYNN CASE GOT TWO VOTES...SO WALKER AND CASE APPARENTLY WIN THE TWO CITY COMMISSION SEATS IN SALUDA.

THESE VOTE TOTALS ARE ALL UN-OFICIAL UNTIL THE CANVASS IN ABOUT A WEEK. 

AND WE REMIND YOU THESE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS ARE IN STAGGERED YEARS. IN OTHER WORDS, THOSE MAYORS AND COUNCIL MEMBERS AND COMMISSIONERS SEATS NOT ON TODAY’S BALLOT WILL BE ON THE BALLOT IN 2017.

BY WHKP NEWS DIRECTOR LARRY FREEMAN 11/3/15

 

 

ACCUWEATHER'S WINTER WEATHER PREDICTION:  MILD BUT WET FOR WNC & THE SOUTHEAST

ACCUWEATHER'S WINTER WEATHER PREDICTION: MILD BUT WET FOR WNC & THE SOUTHEAST

ACCUWEATHER SAYS A STRONG EL NINO FACTOR IN THE WEATHER WILL MEAN A WET WINTER FOR THE SOUTHEAST U.S. AND FOR WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA

Winter will kick off with mild weather in the Northeast and mid-Atlantic as an intensifying El Niño influences the weather pattern across the country.

El Niño will drive heavy rain and mountain snow to California, helping to replenish reservoirs but also threatening to cause flooding and mudslides. Meanwhile, a rain deficit will continue to build in the Northwest.

A regional breakdown of the AccuWeather.com 2015-2016 U.S. Winter Forecast can be found below.

JUMP TO: Brutal Cold Won't Return to Northeast, Mid-Atlantic; Weak Lake-Effect Season in Store for Great Lakes| Severe Weather to Grip Southeast, Gulf Coast States | Springlike Highs to Visit Northern Plains on Occasion; Below-Normal Temperatures to Grip Southern Plains | Below-Normal Snowfall to Exacerbate Drought Woes in Northwest, Northern Rockies | Wet, Snowy Conditions to Frequent the Southwest | El Niño to Send Rain, Snow to Parched California

After the winter of 2014-2015 brought brutal cold to the northeastern United States, this season is set to be milder overall, but particularly during the early part of the season.

"We just don't know exactly yet whether or not we're going to see the pattern turn cold and snowy," AccuWeather Expert Long-Range Forecaster Paul Pastelok said. "...There is an opportunity that [the weather] could change on us as we get into February and early March."

Regardless, the Northeast and mid-Atlantic can expect fewer days of subzero temperatures than last year. February of 2015 went down in the record books as the second-coldest February on record for both the region and for eight states individually, including Pennsylvania, New York and all six New England states.

Farther west, in the Great Lakes region, a lack of arctic air for much of the early and midwinter will lead to a weak lake-effect season, causing snowfall and precipitation totals to fall below normal.

Upstate New York and northern New England are not in the clear, however, as rain events along the coast early in the season can translate to snow in the higher elevations.

2015-2016 US Winter Forecast: Rain, Snow in Store for Parched California

 

As one of the strongest El Niños in the last 50 to 60 years continues to develop, it's likely that heavy rainfall and severe weather will take aim at the Southeast and Gulf Coast.

El Niño patterns often result in severe weather outbreaks for this region as bigger, stronger systems are able to take a southern storm track.

Florida, in particular, may have a higher risk for tornadoes this season. Southern Georgia and South Carolina are also at a higher risk for severe weather events.

Overall, heavy rain will be widespread for the South. As the season progresses, additional rain on an already saturated ground will increase the chances for flooding.

"As far as the biggest impacts go, I would look at Shreveport and New Orleans, Louisiana, and Mobile, Alabama. I think those areas are going to get hit with a lot of rain," Pastelok said.

Wintry weather will become active early on in the northern Plains, with the potential for a few snowstorms as early as November and December.

As is typical for this region, however, the weather pattern will be a roller coaster, causing wintry weather to back off in the middle of the season and return again just before spring.

‘There will be a good portion of the middle part of the season where [the weather] doesn't do a lot, but the bookends can get pretty active," Pastelok said.

At times, temperatures in the north-central Plains could soar into the 50s or even the 60s F for a couple of days as mild weather is pushed out from the Northwest and northern Rockies.

In the southern Plains, the building El Niño will dictate an active southern storm track, meaning the region could end up with above-normal precipitation.

RELATED: Weather is Serious Business, Explains AccuWeather CEO Barry Lee Myers El Niño May Intensify Into Strongest in 50 Years AccuWeather.com Video Wall

Below-normal precipitation, in the form of both rain and snow, and above-normal temperatures will define the season across the Northwest and northern and eastern Rockies.

For the season as a whole, the region is likely to end up with snowfall totals much below normal.

"Ski areas in the northern Rockies may be missing out on significant fresh snowpack. They're going to have to make most of their snow at night," Pastelok said.

The dryness across the area could eventually translate to building drought conditions if spring rain is not abundant.

Wet and snowy conditions will frequent the southwestern United States this winter.

"It may not happen early on, but by the middle of the season, I think they're going to get hit very hard and frequently," Pastelok said. "That's going to put a lot of snow in the mountains and cause a lot of rain in the valley and desert areas."

"Phoenix, Arizona, and Albuquerque, New Mexico, should prepare for significant precipitation this season. "These cities are not going to miss out this year," according to Pastelok.

Across the region, a few precipitation events will occur during November and December, but things will pick up deeper into the season.

"January and February will bring more frequent heavy events," he said.

"There's good news and bad news for California," according to Pastelok.

El Niño will help to set up a pattern of rain and snow for California, which is still dealing with devastating drought conditions and rampant wildfires.

Copious amounts of rain from systems over the same area, a theme which occurs often during this type of weather pattern, can lead to problems for California.

The state is dealing with more than 9 million acres of wildfire-charred land, more than 2.5 million acres more than the 10-year average.

Fires approach a home near Lower Lake, Calif., Friday, July 31, 2015. A series of wildfires were intensified by dry vegetation, triple-digit temperatures and gusting winds. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

"[The heavy rain] is going to lead to patterns in the mud where water will travel rapidly and lead to flooding," Pastelok said. "It's going to lead to developing streams and rivers that are not supposed to be there, and you're going to get localized street flooding in the cities."

Mudslides and basement flooding may also prove devastating for homeowners.

However, there's a silver lining: The 2015-2016 season may yield triple the amount of snow than that which fell last year in the central and northern mountains.

"This is what fills the reservoirs in the spring and early summer," Pastelok said.

Central California will finally experience the feast that follows famine. Pastelok believes his forecast may even be conservative for this area.

While the rain and snow will put a dent in the water crisis, it won't result in the be-all and end-all residents are hoping for.

"Will it be enough? I think we need a couple of these kinds of years and I'm not sure we're going to get that," Pastelok said.

 

 

 

 

BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY SAYS...ENJOY THE VIEW THIS FALL---SAFELY

BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY SAYS...ENJOY THE VIEW THIS FALL---SAFELY

Blue Ridge Parkway rangers and staff plan to welcome approximately two million visitors along the 469-mile scenic route this October. With fall color beginning, park managers want to remind the public that a Parkway drive is different than most.  The Parkway’s unique design includes many steep grades, limited sight distances, and beautiful built in distractions; as a result, drivers must pay extra attention to ensure a safe and memorable visit.

To help prevent accidents from occurring, visitors are asked to keep the following guidelines in mind before heading out on the Parkway…

  • Keep speeds within posted limits and be prepared for heavy traffic, wildlife and non-motorized users that may slow traffic further.
  • Stay focused! Put cell phones and other devices away in a glove compartment or bag; and out of reach of the driver. 
  • Use overlooks to enjoy the views. When on the road, driving needs your full attention. 
  • Bicyclists should keep as far to the right as possible, and allow opportunities for traffic to move around you. Multiple riders need to stay in a single file line and should avoid groups larger than 4 riders. The Parkway is not recommended for inexperienced cyclists, especially during the highest period for traffic volume. 
  • Motorcyclists need to pay special attention to tunnels where lighting and visibility are poor, leaves and other debris on the roadway such as branches and rocks and early icing on bridges and at higher elevations. Slow down and focus on the road. 
  • Take your time - stop at visitor centers along the route and learn something new about the Parkway from a ranger.

Visitors can also find specific information to prepare for their Parkway adventure from a variety of sources. Park updates and information are available on a variety of social media platforms including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. The park website provides a real-time road closure map, facility schedules, suggested itineraries, visitor center locations, and much more at www.nps.gov/blri; and regularly updated, recorded fall foliage information is available at 828.298.0398.

As October comes to a close, Parkway staff will begin the traditional seasonal closure of visitor services in certain areas. Some concession and visitor center areas will continue to be open, pending any weather related closures. A full schedule of seasonal closing dates is available at http://www.nps.gov/blri/planyourvisit/hours.htm

DUKE DELAYS TRANSMISSION LINE ANNOUNCEMENT

DUKE DELAYS TRANSMISSION LINE ANNOUNCEMENT

After a late summer filled with contoversy over a proposed new 40 mile high voltage transmission line between Campobello South Carolina and the Lake Julian power plant in Skyland, Duke Energy announced Thursday it is delaying the announcement of that route until early November.

Because of widespread opposition to the proposed routes, Duke had earlier promised to speed up their decision and announce it early in October.

Duke now says they received more than 9000 public comments and are still going through them all.

And Duke also points out they are taking a closer look at possible alternatives to that proposed new transmission line.

So...there here will be no announcement for st least a moth longer...and Duke is considering alternatives to the line.

It's all part of a billion dollar upgrade which will also convert the Lake Julian power plant from operating on coal to cleaner burning natural gas.

A final decision on the new transmission line will be in the hands of the 7 members of the North Carolina Utilities Commission.

BETTY JOHNSON AND  KATHY GRIFFIN HONORED AS FARMER (S) OF THE YEAR

BETTY JOHNSON AND KATHY GRIFFIN HONORED AS FARMER (S) OF THE YEAR

Betty Johnson and Kathy Griffin, wife and daughter of the late Jack Johnson, received this year's farmer of the year award during a recent ceremony.

The Johnson family has lived and farmed in Henderson County for nine generations.

The presentation of the award was last Saturday and was intended to coincide with the annual Farm-City Day event in Jackson Park but Farm-City Day had to be canceled because of heavy rain.

 

 

STATE APPEALS COURT JUDGE UP - HOLDS TRANSFER OF ASHEVILLE  WATER SYSTEM

STATE APPEALS COURT JUDGE UP - HOLDS TRANSFER OF ASHEVILLE WATER SYSTEM

N.c. Appeals Court Judge Howard Manning Tuesday upheld action taken by the NC General Assembly in 2013 which transfers the City of Asheville ' s water stem to the Metropolitan Sewage District.

The legislation,  which was appealed by the City of Asheville, essentially creates a new regional water and sewer authority which will serve Buncombe County and parts of northern Henderson County.

The new authority will be over - seen by appointed representatives from Henderson County and from the Town of Mills River as well as from Buncombe County and the City of Asheville.

The legislation had been co - sponsored by Rep. Chuck McGrady and the court ruling was applauded Tuesday by both McGrady and State Senator Tom Apodaca.