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BO CALDWELL IS THE NEW PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT

BO CALDWELL IS THE NEW PUBLIC SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT

 

 Bo Caldwell will succeed David Jones as Henderson County Public Schools’ superintendent, effective July 1, the Henderson County Board of Public Education announced Monday during the regular monthly school board meeting.
 
Caldwell currently serves as Assistant Superintendent of Administrative Services, and has a rich history in HCPS administration and in the classroom. Upon earning his Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Mars Hill College in 1984, Caldwell taught mathematics at Edneyville High until 1990, when he became Assistant Principal at Flat Rock Junior High.
 
From 1993 to 1995, Caldwell was Principal at Atkinson Elementary, and in 1995 he became Principal at Apple Valley Middle. In 2002, he transferred to Central Office and served as Senior Director of Facility Management through 2010. In 2010, Caldwell was named Senior Director of Human Resources, and in 2014 became Assistant Superintendent of Administrative Services.
 
Caldwell’s superintendency begins July 1, following Jones’ retirement on June 30.
 
“We’re sorry to lose Mr. Jones, but we’re fortunate to have someone who is truly qualified and knows the system very well,” Board Chair Ervin Bazzle said of Caldwell. “We look forward to a continuation of exemplary work.”
 
In addition to his undergraduate degree, Caldwell holds a Masters of Arts in Education and an Educational Specialist Degree from Western Carolina University. He lives in Hendersonville with his wife of 27 years, Jackie. His children, Bryce and Ellie Caldwell are 2012 and 2015 graduates of North Henderson High, respectively.
 
Caldwell serves the community as a member of the Henderson County Board of Public Health, the Henderson County Board of Recreation, the Kiwanis Club of Hendersonville, and as member and deacon at Mount Moriah Baptist Church. 
 
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LOCAL SCHOOL STUDENTS FIGHT DRUG ABUSE WITH "WE ARE HOPE"

LOCAL SCHOOL STUDENTS FIGHT DRUG ABUSE WITH "WE ARE HOPE"

 

In partnership with HopeRx, students in Henderson County Public Schools’ four middle and six high schools are taking a public stand against substance abuse during the week-long “We Are Hope” campaign March 21-25, which will be recognized Wednesday, March 16 by Henderson County Commissioners. 
 
It's the second year the local high schools’ student government organizations and leaders have organized the campaign with HopeRx, and this year students at Apple Valley Middle, Flat Rock Middle, Hendersonville Middle, and Rugby Middle, will be joining Balfour Education Center, North Henderson, West Henderson, East Henderson, Hendersonville and Henderson County Early College high schools in learning about substance abuse and misuse.
 
At their March 16 meeting, Henderson County Commissioners will adopt a resolution recognizing the last week of school before Spring Break as the local middle and high schools’ united stand against substance abuse, and will publicly name and commend the student leaders who are planning the week’s events in their individual schools. 
 
The week will include assemblies at each school featuring locals in the community who have either personally overcome substance abuse or seen firsthand the devastating effects of addiction. Daily awareness activities will stress the importance of remaining substance free and throughout the campaign, each school will have pledge banners bearing the school’s mascot and a pledge to be substance free, which includes abstaining from the use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and prescription drugs not prescribed to the student. 
 
“Ribbons in each school color will be available for all students who sign a banner to remain substance free and ribbons will be placed on trees at school campuses to represent the pledge,” said Julie Huneycutt, director of HopeRx.
 
Students will sign the banners throughout the week, and the “We Are Hope” campaign will culminate at 12 p.m. Friday, March 25, when all 10 banners will be hung from the Henderson County Historic Courthouse pillars. Bo Caldwell, HCPS’ assistant superintendent of administrative services, Henderson County Sheriff Charles McDonald, Rep. Chuck McGrady, and Hendersonville Mayor Barbara Volk are scheduled to speak at the event.
 
“(Students) have chosen a very strategic week to kick off this campaign: the week before spring break,” Huneycutt said. “It is very important to the students that our community knows this is an event to stand as one school system.” 
 
HopeRx is a coalition designed to unite community leaders, parents, educators, students, healthcare providers, EMS workers and volunteers, law enforcement, the judicial system, civic organizations and faith groups throughout Henderson County to work collaboratively to address the issues of prescription drug abuse, one of the top three health problems in the county.
 
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In addition to the March 25 banner hanging event, media is invited to the March 16 County Commissioners meeting, which begins at 9 a.m. in the Henderson County Historic Courthouse at 1 Historic Courthouse Square # 4, Hendersonville, N.C.
 

 

SPRING ALLERGIES A PROBLEM RIGHT NOW; HENDERSONVILLE POLLEN COUNT SKY HIGH

SPRING ALLERGIES A PROBLEM RIGHT NOW; HENDERSONVILLE POLLEN COUNT SKY HIGH

 

SPRING ALLERGIES DUE TO POLLEN ARE POPPING UP ALL OVER THE PLACE IN WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA.  IN

HENDERSONVILLE, ON A SCALE OF 0 TO 10, THE LOCAL POLLEN COUNT IS NOW WELL OVER 9.  THE MAIN CAUSES RIGHT

NOW ARE POLLEN FROM ELM, MAPLE AND JUNIPER.  IF YOU ARE AN ALLERGY SUFFERED, WE HOPE THE FOLLOWING

INFOMATION HELPS:

 

Spring Allergies

 
 

 

Spring is the time of year for seasonal allergies. As the trees start to bloom and the pollen is released into the atmosphere, allergy sufferers begin their annual ritual of sniffling and sneezing. Each year, 58 million Americans fall prey to seasonal allergic rhinitis, more commonly known as hay fever.

Although there is no magical cure for spring allergies, there are a number of ways to combat them, from http://www.webmd.com/drugs/index-drugs.aspx" object_type="" keywordsetid="8684" keywordid="34731" externalid="09D1C68D81D74991" directive="friendlyurl" crosslinktype="Article" crosslinkid="31476" chronic_id="">medication to household habits.

 

Recommended Related to Allergies

 

Relief for Allergies at School

Help your child manage allergies at school with these tips. Help Kids Claim Their Fame: Kids with allergies or asthma can excel in sports. But they won't have stamina if allergies are uncontrolled. Make sure kids take medications! Circle of Support: Help kids get support at school. Meet with teachers, the nurse, and the coach to discuss the child's allergies or asthma. Develop a game plan. Game Plan: Give the school nurse an "allergy card" with critical details -- your child's allergy...

Read the Relief for Allergies at School article > >

 
 

What causes spring allergies?

The biggest spring allergy trigger is pollen -- tiny grains released into the air by trees, grasses, and weeds for the purpose of fertilizing other plants. When pollen grains get into the nose of someone who’s allergic, they send the immune system into overdrive.

 

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The immune system, mistakenly seeing the pollen as foreign invaders, releases antibodies -- substances that normally identify and attack bacteria, viruses, and other illness-causing organisms. The antibodies attack the allergens, which leads to the release of chemicals called histamines into the blood. Histamines trigger the runny nose, itchy eyes, and other symptoms of allergies.

Pollen can travel for miles, spreading a path of misery for allergy sufferers along the way. The higher the pollen count, the greater the misery. The pollen count measures the amount of allergens in the air in grains per cubic meter. You can find out the daily pollen count in your area by watching your local weather forecast or by visiting the NAB: Pollen & Mold Counts page on the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology’s web site.

Here are some of the biggest spring allergy offenders:

Trees

Alder
Ash
Aspen
Beech
Box elder
Cedar
Cottonwood
Cypress
Elm
Hickory
Juniper
Maple
Mulberry
Oak
Olive
Palm
Pine
Poplar
Sycamore
Willow

Grasses and weeds

Bermuda
Fescue
Johnson
June
Orchard
Perennial rye
Redtop
Saltgrass
Sweet vernal
Timothy

Allergy symptoms tend to be particularly high on breezy days when the wind picks up pollen and carries it through the air. Rainy days, on the other hand, cause a drop in the pollen counts, because the rain washes away the allergens.

 

FOR EAGER EARLY LOCAL GARDENERS---THE BEST GARDEN GUIDE IS NOW AVAILABLE

FOR EAGER EARLY LOCAL GARDENERS---THE BEST GARDEN GUIDE IS NOW AVAILABLE

SOMNE EARLY WARM DAYS MAKE LOCAL GARDENERS EAGER TO GET OUTSIDE, START DIGGING, AND START PLANTING.  BUT BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU PLANT THIS EARLY...AND REMEMBER THE AVERAGE DATE IOF THE LAST KILLING FROST IN THE SPRING IN HENDERSON COUNTY IS APRIL 22ND....SO THERE ARE PLENTY OF "COLD SNAPS" STILL TO COME TO KILL TENDER YOUNG VEGETATION.

BUT FOR SERIOUS GARDENERS, THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC GARDEN GUIDE IS NOW AVAILABLE...

 

Now Available: The 2016 Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Guide

From urban spaces to backyard places, the Almanac’s gardening annual is THE go-to guide for how to grow vegetables, fruit, herbs, heirlooms, and more!

 

Break out the hand tools and garden gloves because spring has sprung—and with it The 2016 Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Guide!

The latest edition of this anticipated annual features practical advice on how to grow a garden anywhere, even if the only landscape available is an apartment patio in the heart of a city. For this, the Garden Guide gets a little help from acclaimed You Grow Girl!blogger Gayla Trail who shows urban dwellers that growing their own gardens is easy with a bit of sun, a container or two, and a touch of ingenuity.

For those with small backyard spaces or rocky, poor, or abused soil, The Garden Guide also offers an easy, do-it-yourself solution for raised beds that involves little more than a couple of cedar boards, a hammer, and some newspaper.

But what to grow? The 2016 Garden Guide has that covered with advice on healthful edibles—everything from salsa fixings and strawberries to kitchen herbs and legumes—along with tasty recipes to put the harvest to good use.

This year’s Garden Guide also has tips to share on:

·      Growing green manure

·      Turning any outdoor space into a tropical escape or desert oasis

·      Incorporating songbird-friendly shrubs

·      Why (and how) to welcome toads

·      12 must-have garden tools

·      Herbal remedies every gardener should have on hand

Garden Guide Editor Mare-Anne Jarvela says that this edition was inspired by all of the reasons she hears as to why gardeners, old and new, pick up their trowels to create a growing space of their own.

“The benefits and joys of gardening take many forms,” notes Jarvela. “The top reasons we hear from gardeners include desires to grow good food, save money, share the outdoors with kids, and support the environment by encouraging pollinators. The 2016 Garden Guide is about all of these things and more. It was important to us that we create a publication that’s more than a magazine—it’s a collectible resource that growers can come back to again and again.”

The 2016 Garden Guide—like its parent publication, The Old Farmer’s Almanac—is published annually. Its Web site, Almanac.com/Garden, offers tips, advice, and green inspiration every day. Almanac.com/Garden also invites gardeners to ask questions and share advice and ideas.

The 2016 Garden Guide is now available for the budget-friendly price of $4.99 at plant nurseries, home centers, and wherever books and magazines are sold. Print and digital versions are available online at Almanac.com/Shop.

Also available is The Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Planner, an online garden planning tool that takes the guesswork out of planning, plotting, and planting any garden, no matter its size, shape, or layout. The Old Farmer’s Almanac Garden Planner—which is completely free for 7 days—can be found at http://GardenPlanner.Almanac.com.

 

EARLY ONE-STOP VOTING ENDED AT 1PM SATURDAY; NEAR RECORD NUMBERS VOTED EARLY THIS YEAR

EARLY ONE-STOP VOTING ENDED AT 1PM SATURDAY; NEAR RECORD NUMBERS VOTED EARLY THIS YEAR

 

Early in-person voting wrapped up Saturday for Tuesday's North Carolina primary.

Early-voting sites in all 100 counties closed at 1 p.m. Saturday.

Polls opened March 3, marking the first time most voters had to show photo identification before they could cast ballots.

On the first day of early voting in 2016, polls saw nearly 60,000 voters. Less than 20,000 voters came out 4 years ago.

Some folks also say the convenience of early voting brought them out this week.

Henderson County voters has the option of voting early at the Board of Elections, at the libraries in Etowah and Fletcher, at Flat Rock Villge Hall and at the Edneyville Community Building. 

Close to 490,000 had cast ballots in North Carolina as of Friday morning, in-person or through the mail. That represents 7.5 percent of the state's 6.5 million registered voters.

Mail-in ballots must be turned in or postmarked by Tuesday to count.

If you missed early voting, visit the NC State Board of Elections Polling Place website to find your precinct for Tuesday's primary.

 

LOCAL GIRLS WISHES COME TRUE WITH PROM DRESSES

LOCAL GIRLS WISHES COME TRUE WITH PROM DRESSES

 

An event kicked off Friday that provides juniors and seniors with free prom dresses.

It's the 10th annual Grant Her Wish prom dress event at the Beehive Resale Shop on Main Street in Hendersonville.

Girls who cannot afford a prom dress can stop in and get one for free Friday 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

A student at Henderson High School, Juliet Townsend, was the luckiest of them all, finding what she was looking for on her 17th birthday.

"I found two dresses in my size and went in the back and I ended up liking them both," Townsend said.

However, this event gives the girls more than dresses to wear. It gives them confidence and the opportunity to go to prom.

"I feel pretty good, feel like I'm going to go walk the runway," Waters said.

Miller's Fine Dry Cleaning, the Beehive Resale Shop, and Summit Marketing Group have been partnering now for several years to make this event possible.

 

LINE-UP ANNOUNCED FOR THIS SUMMER'S "RHYTHM AND BREWS" CONCERTS

LINE-UP ANNOUNCED FOR THIS SUMMER'S "RHYTHM AND BREWS" CONCERTS

 

 

The Rhythm & Brews crew is excited to announce the 2016 Headliners for downtown Hendersonville’s premier annual concert experience! This year’s headliners run the genre gamut and, as always you can count on us to deliver high quality across the board. Whether you love old time bluegrass or the funky stuff, R&B will put a smile on your face and broaden your musical horizons.

Beginning in May and running through September, these free outdoor shows will ramp up the fun in downtown on the 3rd Thursday of each month; May 19thJune 16thJuly 21stAugust 18th and September 15th. The shows will feature local singer songwriters and opening acts at 5:00 and 6:00 with our headliners performing from 7:00 to 9:00 pm.

 

This season opens with the eight piece ensemble Major and the Monbacks hailing from Norfolk, VA. The Monbacks feature a lively horn and powerful rhythm section that merges retro 60’s rock and roll with the high energy and horn laden grit of southern soul!

 

June’s show features Larry Cordle & Lonesome Standard Time. Larry is a blue grass legend whose more recent honors include a nomination for “Recorded Event of the Year” by the International Bluegrass Music Association for “Against the Grain” by Larry Cordle & Lonesome Standard Time featuring Garth Brooks. Garth represents only the most recent in a long list of bluegrass and country legends who this fabulous musician and talented songwriter has worked with.

July’s concert brings back the band who got this whole thing started way back in May of 2013, The Broadcast who continue to wow audiences with their Grace Slick meets Led Zeppelin sound. Breaking new ground with an infectious energy and authentic approach to rock & roll, the Broadcast and front woman Caitlin Krisko are not to be missed!

 

August welcomes the return of another Rhythm & Brews favorite Mountain Heart. Fearlessly revolutionizing the way acoustic music can be presented and played Mountain Heart has become synonymous with cutting-edge excellence in acoustic music since the group’s creation in 1999. Mountain Heart's musical virtuosity, unmatched energy, and keen sense of entertainment dynamics have helped them to forge a highly unique sound and stage show which appeals to an ever growing variety of musical tastes. Come see if that includes you!

 

Finally, we close out the 2016 season with something new. The Hip Abduction, a sextet hailing from St. Petersburg, Fl, is an afro-pop/indie rock band that mixes reggae bass lines with traditional African stringed instruments for a funky high energy performance. With a breezy, good time groove-and-sway sound, mixing flavors of reggae, roots, funk, and Afro-beat into an intoxicating brew they are a perfect match for closing out our 2016 season.

 

The shows, which are moving to Main Street this year, will once again feature some great local brews alongside the fantastic beats. Featured drinks will include the craft brew stylings of Henderson County’s own Sierra Nevada and Southern Appalachian Breweries and the delectable grape creations of Saint Paul Mountain Vineyards. Flat Rock Ciderworks will once again be returning and new this year is Bold Rock Cider!

 

A family friendly event the HandsOn! Family Zone, a kid friendly destination within the show, and the Pardee misting tent will once again round out an entertainment experience designed for the whole family!

 

 

 

PLANS BEING MADE EARLY FOR THIS YEAR'S BLUE RIDGE BBQ FESTIVAL

PLANS BEING MADE EARLY FOR THIS YEAR'S BLUE RIDGE BBQ FESTIVAL

 

FREE BBQ FESTIVAL ADMISSION 
for Polk County and Landrum residents ALL DAY FRIDAY!

The Steering Committee of the Blue Ridge BBQ & Music Festival announced that admission to the 2016 Festival will be free all day to all residents of Polk County and Landrum (zip code 29356) with ID that shows home address.

“It’s time to recognize the countless ways the local people have contributed to the success of the Festival over the years,” said Chairman Eric McKaig. “We started ‘FREE on FRIDAY from 10 am to 2 pm’ three years ago for the general public, and we are still going to do that this year. But if you live in Polk County or Landrum, you get in free until we close Friday,” he said.

The Chairman went on to explain that at all other times admission will be $8 for adults, and kids 12 and under get in free with a paying adult. Active duty military men and women are always free with military ID. Admission includes parking, shuttle to the gate, and all concerts

The Festival will be held from 10 am to 11 pm on Friday and Saturday, June 10 and 11, at Harmon Field in Tryon. Both days will feature music on two stages, Carnival rides and games, an exceptional juried Craft Fair, and some of the best BBQ to be had anywhere—plus a wide variety of other foods and  beverages. On Saturday there will also be the 5th annual Classic Car Show, with approximately 200 beautifully restored cars and trucks; a “HOG Run to Fun” motorcycle poker run beginning at Harley Davidson in Greenville and ending at the Festival; and, at the end of the day, the Grand Finale Fireworks show by Zambelli Fireworks.

In an effort to be “family friendly,” vendors this year will be offering smaller, less expensive portions as well as their regular menu items, and there will be many choices besides BBQ. Kids’ Ride Bracelets will be available again this year—that is, unlimited rides for just $15 in two sessions each day: from the time the gates open until 4pm and from 4pm until 10pm.

For more information about this year’s Festival, go frequently to the website: BlueRidgeBBQFestival.com. Names of entertainers, food vendors, BBQ championship contestants and Craft Fair participants will be added as they become available.

                                 

 

PENROSE MAN DIES FROM BURNS OVER 90% OF HIS BODY FIGHTING OUT-OF-CONTROL BRUSH FIRE

PENROSE MAN DIES FROM BURNS OVER 90% OF HIS BODY FIGHTING OUT-OF-CONTROL BRUSH FIRE

A 65 year old Penrose man has died from burns over 90 per cent of his body Monday while fighting a brush fire near his home that got out of control.

Firemen warn of the danger every spring until things begin to "green up" and the danger from winter fossil fuels, along wuth low dew points and gusty winds, subsides.

The fire Monday blackened just over an acre.

The man...65 year old Wayn Mull...was transported to Mission Hospital but later transferred to a burn unit in Winston-Salem where he diedP

The out of control brush fire was just outside Henderson County and firemen from Little River and Cedar Mountain responded.

By Larry Freeman

 

 

 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOIN H'VILLE CITY COUNCIL URGING VOTERS TO SUPPORT $2 BILLION BOND ISSUE

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOIN H'VILLE CITY COUNCIL URGING VOTERS TO SUPPORT $2 BILLION BOND ISSUE

In their meeting Monday night, the Henderson County Board of Commissioners passed a resolution expressing their support for the $2 billion statewide bond issue that will be on voters ballots in the March 15th primary election.

The county is facing about $100 million in public school construction and renovation needa.  But the state bond allocates NO money for local public school construction. Instead, the bulk of the state bond money will go to the UNC system and to local community colleges. Blue Ridge Community College stands to gain some $2.9 million in improvements and new facilities if voters approve the bond issue.

Hendersonville City Council has already gone on the record supporting the bond issue 

County Commissioners also Monday night did more work re-allocating office space in the 1995 court house.

 By Larry Freeman