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WNC'S MARK MEADOWS OP/ED:  RUSSIAN HYSTERIA PARALYZES THE U.S. CONGRESS

WNC'S MARK MEADOWS OP/ED: RUSSIAN HYSTERIA PARALYZES THE U.S. CONGRESS

 FORMER FBI DIRECTOR COMEY TESTIFIES THURSDAY   

How Russia hysteria paralyzes Congress
By Mark Meadows

(CNN)There is a simple reality that often seems lost on many inside the Beltway: The priorities of the mainstream media and Washington elites are not those of the American people.
If you've watched cable news any given day since President Donald Trump's inauguration, you've been subjected to near-hysterical coverage of the latest "scandal" that threatens to doom his presidency. You've probably seen pundits, analysts and politicians relentlessly deliver talking points on why Trump is unfit to be President -- or even why he should be impeached.

Yet here we are, six months into President Trump's term, and many Americans have grown weary of the constant media frenzy regarding his administration. And those who voted for the President continue to support him.
This principle might seem shocking to Washington, but average Americans -- many of whom I spoke with while campaigning for then candidate Trump -- will tell you that they could care less about the latest Washington cable news drama. Rather, what they care about are policies that impact their families, their pocket books and their everyday lives.
Political media and DC elites often forget that the average American family is struggling to save for the future -- and in fact almost half couldn't cover an unforeseen $400 expense. Despite the fact that millions of men and women across this country are working second and third jobs, they are struggling to feed their families.

Those Americans -- from Western North Carolina to Ohio to Pennsylvania to Michigan -- aren't focused on the latest breaking "news" on the Russia investigation. They care about seeing results and solutions that help their businesses survive -- and grow. They care about having access to high quality, affordable health care. They care about lower taxes that allow them to keep more of their paychecks. They care about the safety and security of their family.

And, in Washington, we have done an abysmal job of maintaining our primary focus on those issues. Passing important policy that impacts every day Americans requires consensus building, marketing our ideas to constituents through media and building coalitions of support. With the constant focus on Russia, big important policy items like tax reform have been stalled.

Now, make no mistake, it's critical that we not gloss over any potential wrongdoing in the Russia investigation. If there were improper activities, we need to get to the bottom of the issue -- and no one will be more committed to getting to the truth on a bipartisan basis than I will.
At the same time, congressional investigations have to follow a deliberative process that takes time. I've conducted oversight of government agencies and officials for the last five years as a member and a subcommittee chairman on the Oversight and Government Reform Committee. I've investigated cases ranging from the Fast and Furious gun-running scandal to the IRS targeting scandal to the Benghazi attack where Americans lost their lives.

In all of these cases, we had a deliberative process that spanned months -- and in some cases, years -- to collect proper evidence, interview key witnesses and see where the facts led. And, in some instances, the facts didn't lead anywhere, and the cases were dropped.

Congress has a duty to hold government officials accountable when necessary, but it is counterproductive for the media and some of my Democrat colleagues to throw unsubstantiated claims regarding White House officials against a wall repeatedly to see what sticks. Media and political hysterics work in opposition to -- not in favor of -- getting to truth and transparency.

Furthermore, while foreign interference in our election is something that our republic cannot and should not tolerate, it seems a bit ludicrous to suggest that tens of millions of Americans made a choice for president based on Russian influence. This is evidenced by the fact that President Trump continues to share the support of a plurality of Americans who believe they made the right choice for president -- because they voted for his agenda.

America must not tolerate Russian intervention in our elections, but we must also not perpetuate a narrative that suggests a far bigger role than any evidence has proven. Fueling exaggeration and constant hysteria is something that could unravel a democracy like ours. It's time we let the special counsel do his job and allow Congress to focus on actually on doing ours.

Let's also remember that through the frenzy, no formal charge has been leveled against anyone in the administration, no direct evidence uncovered and no evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia confirmed. This is nothing warranting wall-to-wall speculation from the pundit class. The hysterics surrounding Russia merely serve to distract from accomplishing the priorities of the American people -- and for what, partisan gain?

There is real work to be done for the American people. Much of it can and should be possible to accomplish on a bipartisan basis. Now is not the time to circle the partisan wagons, but a time to deliver on the commitments we made to the American people. We need to deliver on undoing the harmful regulatory environment that stifles businesses, reforming the tax code to leave more money in the pockets of hard working Americans, replacing our broken health care system with one that will bring down premiums for American families and properly supporting our men and women in uniform.

It's time Congress and the media redirect their attention to those same principles. Let's focus on the American peoples' true priorities -- the Main Street issues that matter.

NORAFIN, A NEW GERMAN MANUFACTURING FACILITY, OFFICIALLY BROKE GROUND IN MILLS RIVER WEDNESDAY MORNING

NORAFIN, A NEW GERMAN MANUFACTURING FACILITY, OFFICIALLY BROKE GROUND IN MILLS RIVER WEDNESDAY MORNING

Ground was officially broken for the 75,000-square-foot Norafin manufacturing facility on School House Road in Mills River Wednesday morning.  Much work had gone into this by the Partnership for Economic Development, the Town of MNills River, Henderson County, Hendersonville's Water Department and others.

Stuart Smith, Norafin’s Business Director for the Americas, said crews will start moving dirt on the site in the coming week, and that the building should be completed by October, with equipment moving in starting in November, and production beginning in in April of next year.

When fully staffed around a year after opening, Norafin expects to employ between 45 and 50 at the site, working closely with Blue Ridge Community College for training and recruiting, Smith said.  The site is located off Banner Farm Road.

 

A SECOND CANDIDATE ANNOUNCES FOR HENDERSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL

A SECOND CANDIDATE ANNOUNCES FOR HENDERSONVILLE CITY COUNCIL

FILING FOR OFFICE IS 12 NOON JULY 7 UNTIL 12 NOON JULY 21   

A student at Blue Ridge Community College and a Hendersonville High School graduate, John Moore celebrated his 20th birthday Monday, and on Tuesday he announced that he will seek a seat on Hendersonville City Council in the municipal elections this fall.

According to the Times-News, Moore said he’s running because he wants to represent a growing minority in Hendersonville that feels is underrepresented. He also wants to protect the city’s environment and help hard-working middle-class families, students, young people and seniors on fixed incomes.

At a rally hosted by Progressive Organized Women Tuesday and attended by about 100 people, , Moore’s  made his announcement.

Filing opens July 7 for municipal elections in Henderson County, including the Hendersonville City Council race, where two seats are up for election. The seats are held by Jeff Miller and Jerry Smith. Mayor Barbara Volk’s seat is also up for election.  Filing will continue for only a two week period, ending at noon on Friday July 21st.  Filing will take place at the Board of Elections on Central Street.

The primaries for municipal elections are set for Oct. 10, with the general election on Nov. 7.

Moore is the second candidate to declare a run for one of the council seats, following Debbie Roundtree’s announcement last month.

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS APPROVE $136.4 MILLION FY 17-18 COUNTY BUDGET

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS APPROVE $136.4 MILLION FY 17-18 COUNTY BUDGET

WITH NO PROPERTTY TAX INCREASE   

ARTIFICIAL TURF FOR HHS ATHLTIC FIELD STILL COMING BUT DELAYED   

Henderson County commissioners made it official Monday...the county’s budget for fiscal year 2017-18 was approved. Commissioners passed the $136,489,200 budget after making several substantial changes Monday.

The new total is a $1,475,000 increase from the $135-million proposed budget commissioners had been looking at earlier.

The largest change Monday was proposed by Commissioner Grady Hawkins, and is an addition of $2 million to the debt service fund for the upcoming budget in preparation for climbing debt service payments in the future to pay for the county’s construction of new facilities or capital improvement projects.

Commissioner Grady Hawkins made the point that the county should be looking two or three years into the future, when debt service payments are set to increase by about $6 million.
Another big change was the removal of $800,000 the board had set aside for the purchase of property on Fleming Street near Hendersonville High, to be used as parking for the new school. Instead, the board moved to purchase the property in the current fiscal year, lumping in the payments with the debt service for the Hendersonville High project.

The county will also get a $5,000 bonus from the property owners for closing the deal this year instead of next, according to Commission Chairman Michael Edney.

Like the other three county high schools, Hendersonville High will also get artificial turf on its athletic field...but when that will happen is still up in the air. Final plans for the new HHS campus won’t be ready until later this year and engineers say there are some utility issues that need to be resolved.

The new county budget keeps the tax rate where it is now with no increase...and with no roll-back in the tax rate after last years 10 per cent property tax increase and a roughly $45 million fund balance.

THIS YEAR'S APPLE FESTIVAL WILL CARRY A NEW LOGO

THIS YEAR'S APPLE FESTIVAL WILL CARRY A NEW LOGO

NC APPLE FESTIVAL DIRECTOR ANNOUNCES NEW FESTIVAL LOGO FOR 2017

Festival Executive Director David Nicholson announed this week that, "We are pleased to present our logo for the 71st North Carolina Apple Festival."

"This year’s logo was designed by our President, Lee Henderson-Hill, along with NC Printing of Hendersonville, NC. We will feature the logo on our limited addition t-shirts, which will be printed by NC Printing and other merchandise offerings." 

President Hill issued the following statement concerning the logo.

"We are excited to release the 2017 NC Apple festival logo. The logo captures all that North Carolina, the apple season and fall harvest is about. The red cardinal has special significance to North Carolina as the state bird but it was also my late grandmother, Reba Prince’s favorite bird so cardinals hold a special place in the heart of me and my family. The apple blossoms signify that start of the growing season and the beautiful grouping of apples reflect the abundant harvest after many weeks of laboring in the fields.
The logo harkens back to the great artwork you would find on the wooden shipping crates that were used to transport apples all across the United States. Many of you may have some dusty treasures of your grandparents somewhere in your basements.

Come join us at the 71st Annual North Carolina Apple Festival as we celebrate the bountiful, healthy harvest of delicious locally grown apples."

For additional information concerning the North Carolina Apple Festival, please contact David Nicholson, Executive Director
828-606-5628 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A PUBLIC "CELEBRATION OF LIFE" SET FOR 4-6PM TUESDAY AT THE CEDARS---FOR DR. WILLIAM A. "DOC" LAMPLEY

A PUBLIC "CELEBRATION OF LIFE" SET FOR 4-6PM TUESDAY AT THE CEDARS---FOR DR. WILLIAM A. "DOC" LAMPLEY

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED   

A PHYSICIAN WHO CARED FOR PATIENTS IN THE HENDERSONVILLE AREA FOR WELL OVER A THIRD OF A CENTURY, DR. WILLIAM LAMPLEY, HAS DIED.  A SPOKESMAN FOR THOMAS SHEPHERD AND SON FUNERAL DIRECTOR CONFIRMED FOR WHKP NEWS THAT THEY ARE HANDLING ARRANGMENTS FOR DR. LAMPLEY WHO DIED JUNE 1ST.  THE SPOKSMAN INDICATED THERE WILL BE PRIVATE FAMILY SERVICES IN ADDITION TO THE PUBLIC SERVICE ON TUESDAY.   

(WHKP Facebook and Hendersonville Lightning photos)

In a story on his life, work, and service to the Hendersonville community, the Hendersonville Times-News wrote in November 1910:

"Lampley worked as a general surgeon at Pardee Hospital from its inception in 1953 until his retirement 20 years ago.

“I run into people all the time who remember being my patient,” Lampley says. “I think that’s the most satisfying thing I get after 37 years there is to hear people are happy with the work I’ve done.”

During his career, Doc served as a Navy medical officer during World War II, as medical examiner for Henderson County and as the longtime team physician for Hendersonville High School’s basketball and football teams.

Born in Greenville, S.C., Lampley moved to Hendersonville with his family when he was 3 years old."

More from the Times-News article on Dr. Lampley from November 1980---

"Lampley stays active and full of good humor, despite losing his left leg some years ago mto arterial sclerosis.

He keeps his hands busy with woodworking, caning chairs, stamp collecting and electrical work — and has not ruled out the possibility of trying hang gliding.

“I always said I wouldn’t hang glide or sky dive — I’ve changed my mind about the hang gliding but haven’t done it yet,” Lampley says with a smile.

His passions have led him to take up flying planes, water- and snowskiing and taking photographs.

“I’ve tried a little bit of most everything,” Lampley says."

Again, long-time and much loved Hendersonville Dr., Bill Lampley...is dead...at the age of 96.  Indications are there will be private family services, but full arrangements are incomplete.

 

 

JULY 19TH:  ONE OF THE MOST TRAGIC EVENTS IN RECENT HENDERSON COUNTY HISTORY:  COMMEMORATION SET FOR PIEDMONT FLIGHT 22 CRASH

JULY 19TH: ONE OF THE MOST TRAGIC EVENTS IN RECENT HENDERSON COUNTY HISTORY: COMMEMORATION SET FOR PIEDMONT FLIGHT 22 CRASH

ON THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MID-AIR COLLISION AND CRASH    

11:30AM IN FRONT OF THE HISTORIC COURTHOUSE ON JULY 19TH   

82 DIED IN THE COLLISION AND CRASH   

THAT GRANITE MARKER COMMEMORATING THE CRASH AND EACH OF THE VICTIMS STANDS ABOUT 100 YARDS WEST OF SITE OF THE CRASH IN THE PARKING LOT OF UNITED FEDERAL CREDIT UNION AT 101 JACK STREET IN HENDERSONVILLE   

Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Crash of Piedmont Airlines Flight 22
July 19, 2017

Hendersonville, NC—On July 19, 1967 at 12:01pm Piedmont Airlines Flight 22, a Boeing 727, and a Cessna 310 were involved in a midair collision over Hendersonville, NC. All occupants of Flight 22, including 74 passengers and five crew members, along with the three occupants of the Cessna were killed. The Cessna disintegrated in the air and the Boeing 727 crashed in a wooded area between Interstate 26 and Camp Pinewood. Hundreds of people witnessed the collision and crash.

The rescue squad, county fire departments, police, sheriff’s deputies and medical personnel responded immediately. The fire was extinguished within 30 minutes and Rescue Squad members began the grim task of searching the dense smoke-filled woods for survivors. It quickly became apparent that there were none. The Henderson County Rescue Squad let the recovery efforts with assistance from over 400 volunteers from throughout North Carolina and South Carolina.

It was through the first responders’ sacrifice and dedication to service that Henderson County was able to recover. Federal officials gave high praise to the responding Fire and Law Enforcement departments and the Rescue Squad for their organization and professionalism. The Henderson County Rescue Squad received commendations from the US Senate, Piedmont Airlines, the US Department of Transportation and the Governor for the Volunteers’ bravery during the disaster.

The Henderson County Heritage Museum, in conjunction with the Henderson County Rescue Squad, will conduct a ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the crash on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at 11:30am in front of the Historic Courthouse in downtown Hendersonville. The public is invited to attend this free event. Speakers will honor the 82 lives lost in the crash and also honor the emergency response from Henderson County and Western North Carolina. Paul Houle, author of The Crash of Piedmont Airlines Flight 22: Completing the Record of the 1967 Midair Collision near Hendersonville, North Carolina, will also speak about the crash and the improvements made in airline safety as a result. There will also be a display of historic photos from the event, video accounts from eye witnesses and a piece of fused metal from the crash.

According to Mark Shepherd, Captain, Henderson County Rescue Squad, “This was one of the largest disasters ever to hit Western North Carolina. It also caused one of the largest emergency responses in area history.”

The following historical photographs are available from the Associated Press per your editorial agreement: 670719020 & 6707190309.

Henderson County Heritage Museum

The Henderson County Heritage Museum, found within the Henderson County Historic Courthouse, seeks to preserve history and a sense of place. Consisting of six rooms, approximately 2000 square feet, the Museum spaces are designed for flexibility, capability, and versatility. This Museum collects, preserves, researches, and exhibits a collection of historical and cultural artifacts. This Museum promotes appreciation for the people who have created and developed this county.

The Heritage Museum partners with other organizations that focus on “history and community” and provides services, upon request, to groups and individuals. The Heritage Museum is open Wed-Sat 10-5 and Sun 1-5. Admission is free.

LOCAL HOME SCHOOL GRADUATION HONORS STUDENTS

LOCAL HOME SCHOOL GRADUATION HONORS STUDENTS

The Henderson County Homeschool Association honored their 2017 graduates in a ceremony this week at First Baptist Church. The students recognized were:

Caleb Arnold, Tristan Auman, Bayli Bayne, Emily Capps, Ellen George, Hannah Goodson, Rebecca Hart, Tiffany Katsch, Kelly McCall, Merriah McCall, Hunter McCall, Reagan Murtagh, Emily Pethtel, Victoria Raymond, Lucas Webb, Lauren Worley, Aja Yorro.

After the ceremony, which included an address by Mr. Josh Sexton as well as biographical videos of the graduates, family and friends gathered for a reception to celebrate the event. HCHA extends it congratulations to these young adults and their families for reaching this milestone in their education.

FOUR YOUNG ATHLETES GET FIRST MICKEY MARVIN SCHOLARSHIPS

FOUR YOUNG ATHLETES GET FIRST MICKEY MARVIN SCHOLARSHIPS

It was a special ceremony in Hendersonville this past week as four outstanding student athletes were awarded with the first ever Mickey Marvin scholarships, each valued at $3,000.

he students and their families gathered for the special ceremony, but the athletes didn't know until they arrived that they would be receiving the awards.

Damien Murphy from North Henderson, Alexander Browning from West Henderson, Christopher Fuge from East Henderson and Jhon Salguero from Hendersonville are this year's recipients.

All four of these student athletes represent the character of the late Mickey Marvin.

WHKP is proud to be an original sponsor of the Micket Marvin Scholarship.

 

 

CITY COUNCIL ADOPTS FY 17-18 BUDGET---CITY PROPERTY TAXES GO UP A PENNY JULY 1

CITY COUNCIL ADOPTS FY 17-18 BUDGET---CITY PROPERTY TAXES GO UP A PENNY JULY 1

COUNCIL REMAINS SPLIT ON SPECIAL USE PERMIT FOR NEW HHS...3 TO 2 IN FAVOR...MUST VOTE AGAIN IN JULY  

"MOU" FOR DOWNTOWN HOTEL/GREY'S HOSIERY MILL DELAYED UNTIL JULY   

In their meetuing Thursday night, Hendersonville city council approved the a $38.7 million budget for FY 17-18. City Manager John Connet presented the new operating budget to the City Council during a meeting Thursday evening. The budget, which goes into effect at the start of the fiscal year July 1, sets the tax rate at 47 cents per $100 of property valuation, a 1-cent increase from last year.

Municipal district taxes for Main Street and Seventh Avenue will remain at 28 and 12 cents respectively per $100 of property valuation.

The budget was adopted unanimously by the council following the public hearing without discussion.

In that new budget, the city's water and sewer fund is balanced at $21 million, with a $5.7 million fund balance appropriation.

The budget includes the following water and sewer rate increases: a 1.5-percent raise for outside city limits customers and a 2-percent increase for inside customers.

This will increase water rates for the average 5,000-gallon residential user inside the city by 42 cents per month, 58 cents for sewer. Outside customers with similar usage will see a 52-cent increase per month for water, 64 cents for sewer. Commercial and industrial users will see a larger increase.

City council remains split on the issue of a special use permit for the proposed new Hendersonville High School campus., 

Similar to the May vote, the council voted 3-2 to adopt the findings of fact regarding a special use permit for the new campus.  Councilman Jerry Smith and Councilman Ron Stephens voted against, with Mayor Barbara Volk and Steve Caraker and Jeff Miller voting in favor.

But because the vote was not a 4-1 or 5-0 supermajority, the council must vote again at the July 6 meeting to adopt the document.

And a "memorandum of understanding" between the city and Belmont Sayre to develop the Grey Hosiery Mill into a downtown hotel was delayed until the council’s July meeting.  City Manager John Connet said the memorandum was not ready for the council to approve Thursday