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SHERIFF WARNS OF NEW LOCAL SCAM

SHERIFF WARNS OF NEW LOCAL SCAM

Multiple residents in and around Henderson County have experienced a series of scam calls over the last couple of days.

The scam callers are telling residents they have a federal warrant for their arrest because they failed to appear for jury duty.  The scam callers are also telling the person receiving the call if they do not immediately go to a CVS pharmacy, Walgreens or Walmart and obtain a PayPal or GreenDot card in the amount of $500 they will immediately have the Sheriff's office come and arrest them. Residents are being told once they obtain the cards they are to give the scam caller the number off the back of the card to ensure it can be logged into their system and they will not be arrested,  plus, their money will be returned once they show up for court.

Henderson County Sheriff Charles McDonald’s is urging residents to not respond or be taken by this latest scam. Sheriff McDonald says “these allegations and demands from the scam callers are not legitimate and have not been initiated from any court or the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office.” If you are contacted by one of these scam callers you should hang up, do not give them any information and contact the Henderson County Sheriff's office at 828-697-4596 to report the call.

LOCAL SCHOOL GRADUATION TIME IS ALMOST HERE

LOCAL SCHOOL GRADUATION TIME IS ALMOST HERE

IT ALL STARTS WITH EARLY COLLEGE GRADUATION THIS THURSDAY

AND MJOE TO COME IN JUNE

Henderson Copunty public schools have annjounced the year's graduation schedule of dates, times, and places:

Thursday, May 12

Henderson County Early College: 6 p.m. in the Blue Ridge Community College Conference Hall

Friday, June 10

East Henderson High: 7 p.m. at E.L. Justus Field *

Hendersonville High: 6 p.m. at Jim Pardue Gymnasium

North Henderson High: 7 p.m. at Glenn C. Marlow Stadium *

West Henderson High: 7:30 p.m. at Johnson Field *

Balfour Education Center: 5:30 p.m. at Living Water Baptist Church

* Weather permitting; will be moved indoors in the event of rain

BACK & FORTH LAWSUITS---NC GOVERNOR FILES A LAWSUIT AGAINST OBAMA'S DOJ---DOJ SUES BACK

BACK & FORTH LAWSUITS---NC GOVERNOR FILES A LAWSUIT AGAINST OBAMA'S DOJ---DOJ SUES BACK

McCrory turns the tables on Obama's Justice Department...and sues the DOJ over HB 2  

Later the same afternoon th U.S. Attorney General announced the DOJ is filing a lawsuit against Northg Carolina, the Governor, and the University of North Carolina  

Billions in federal funds are at stake

Governor Pat McCrory has filed a lawsuit against the Department of Justice over their challenge to a controversial restroom law.

The lawsuit seeks to keep in place the law, which the U.S. Justice Department said last week violated the civil rights of transgender people against sex discrimination on the job and in education.

"The Obama administration is bypassing Congress by attempting to rewrite the law and set restroom policies for public and private employers across the country, not just North Carolina. This is now a national issue that applies to every state and it needs to be resolved at the federal level," McCrory said in a statement. "They are now telling every government agency and every company that employs more than 15 people that men should be allowed to use a women's locker room, restroom or shower facility."

On May 4, the U.S. Department of Justice sent a letter to McCrory, Secretary of Public Safety Frank Perry and UNC System President Margaret Spellings that alleged violations of federal law.

McCrory's lawsuit, filed in federal court in North Carolina, asks a judge to block Justice Department action that could threaten billions of dollars in federal money flowing to the state.

The lawsuit called the law a "common sense privacy policy" and said the Justice Department's position was a "baseless and blatant overreach."

"This is an attempt to unilaterally rewrite long-established federal civil rights laws in a manner that is wholly inconsistent with the intent of Congress and disregards decades of statutory interpretation by the courts," the lawsuit said.

McCrory said on "Fox News Sunday" he was not aware of any North Carolina cases of transgender people using their gender identity to access a restroom and molest someone. Other supporters of the law cite reports elsewhere of men entering women's bathrooms -- thanks to policies allowing transgender people to enter the restrooms aligned with their gender identity -- to highlight the threat of sexual assault.

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TOWN OF MILLS RIVER TO OFFER FREE KAYAK AND CANOE SAFETY COURSE

TOWN OF MILLS RIVER TO OFFER FREE KAYAK AND CANOE SAFETY COURSE

 

THOSE WHO ENJOY THE RIVER CAN ENJOY THE TOWN'S NEW KAYAK AND CANOE LAUNCH AT THE BACK F MILLS RIVER PARK   

The Town of Mills River last year opened a new kayak and canoe launch on the bank of the MillsRiver at the back of MillsRiverPark.

And on Saturday June 11th, the Town, along with the Fitzpatrick Foundation, will be sponsoring at kayak and canoe safety course at the new launch site.  Mills River Town Manager Jeff Wells said the safety course is open to all those interested in enjoying crafts on the river and will be no charge for the course.

Wells said the course will be from 8:30 to 11:30am on June 11th…and the instructors will be Justin Blythe of the Henderson County Rescue Squad and Ricky Brown.

The course will cover the various types of crafts and the

rules for their use; hazards on the river; rescue techniques; personal protective equipment; and trip planning.

Mills River Mayor Larry Freeman said the Town decided to do the safety course after DSS Director Eric Bush, an experienced kayaker,  was killed last December 20th in an accident while kayaking on the Nolichucky River in Mitchell County.  Freeman said Mr. Vaughan Fitzpatrick and the Fitzpatrick Foundation, who had made the Town’s canoe and kayak launch possible, then stepped up to the plate and agreed to co-sponsor and underwrite the cost of the safety course.  Fitzpatrick is an active kayak and canoe enthusiast.

Freeman said, “We’re pleased to see our launch being used by so many who enjoy activities on the river. Our goal, along with the Fitzpatrick Foundation, is to provide expert safety instruction and information so that all those who use the launch and the river can enjoy them safely.”

ACCUWEATHER'S OFFICIAL 2016 SUMMER FORECAST:  WNC WILL BE HOT AND HUMID

ACCUWEATHER'S OFFICIAL 2016 SUMMER FORECAST: WNC WILL BE HOT AND HUMID

2016 US summer forecast: More 90-degree days than normal to scorch East; West to battle drought, fires

 

As a strong El Niño fades, the weather across the country will slowly change. In much of the eastern United States, a hot summer is in store.

Rain and thunderstorms will dominate the pattern in the central and southern Plains, while the opposite occurs in California and the Northwest, and scarce rainfall leads to severe drought conditions.

JUMP TO: Northeast, mid-Atlantic: Heat to come on strong in early summer| Southeast, Gulf Coast: Tropical threats may hold off until late summer | Hot, dry pattern to grip the Midwest and northern Plains | Southern Plains, Southwest: Rain, thunderstorms may keep summer temperatures down | El Niño's aid not enough for the West; Drought to rebuild across the region

Northeast, mid-Atlantic: Heat to come on strong in early summer

Heat will come on strong in June for the Northeast and mid-Atlantic, including in New York City, Boston, and Hartford, Connecticut. However, severe weather in July could turn the warm pattern on its head.

"July is a tricky month where there may be a few cooldowns from thunderstorms and back door fronts, but other than that I think June, July and August, you'll see your series of heat waves," AccuWeather Expert Long-Range Forecaster Paul Pastelok said.

For the season as a whole, numerous 90-degree days will be recorded from Boston to Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.

Late in the season, the intense heat will lead to increasingly dry conditions, which could boost the fire threat across the Northeast.

Southeast, Gulf Coast: Tropical threats may hold off until late summer

Heat will also extend down into the Southeast and Gulf Coast; however, humidity will be higher than in areas farther north.

The lingering effects of El Niño will limit the chances of early season tropical development, but activity will ramp up during the month of August.

"With a trend toward a La Niña pattern, along with warming waters and less wind shear over the Gulf of Mexico, this can lead to impacts anywhere on the Gulf Coast and including the east coast of Florida," Pastelok said.

After heavy spring rainfall for the Gulf Coast, above-normal rain for the summer season may lead to bouts of flooding.

Hot, dry pattern to grip the Midwest and northern Plains

Dryness and heat will be another common theme in the Midwest and northern Plains states.

Heat will develop late spring and early summer across these areas and tighten its grip throughout the season.

"Actually we are seeing evidence of this in parts of the region already," Pastelok said. "If the rest of the spring works out as planned, then these areas may fall into a drought with frequent heat waves during the summer."

Indianapolis, Indiana, Chicago and Minneapolis could enter a minor to moderate drought, he said.

RELATED:
'Cold blob' to be a wild card in the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season
World Meteorological Organization retires 3 names from 2015 hurricane season
California drought: Stormy El Nino winter has some calling for end to strict water usage restrictions

Southern Plains, Southwest: Rain, thunderstorms may keep summer temperatures down

While much of the country will endure above-normal temperatures this season, the southern Plains region may be the only exception.

Rainfall and thunderstorms will be frequent over this region, keeping temperatures at bay.

"Abnormally dry conditions already present in eastern New Mexico, the northern Texas Panhandle and southwestern Kansas are expected to persist, although there will be enough chances for rain to prevent conditions from deteriorating to widespread significant drought," Pastelok said.

In the Southwest, a weaker monsoon season is forecast overall, despite a strong start in July. The pattern will quickly trail off in August, leading to normal to slightly above-normal precipitation.

Despite the rain, the risk for fires will be high due to increased wind.

CITY PROPERTY TAX RATES WILL REMAIN THE SAME IN FY 16-17; WATER RATES WILL GO UP

CITY PROPERTY TAX RATES WILL REMAIN THE SAME IN FY 16-17; WATER RATES WILL GO UP

If you are a City of Hendesonville water customer, look to pay more for that water starting July 1st

In a budget workshop Friday morning, city council approved raising water rates 3 per cent for residential users inside the city and .5 per cent for city water users outside the city.  That equals about a $1.41 per month increase for those inside the city and an increase of about 37 cents monthly for those outside of town.  Water rates are also increasing 3.5 per cent for commercial users inside the city, and 1.5 per cent for commercial users outside of town.  That’s based n 40 thousand gallons per month.

There’s good news for city property taxpayers…the city’s tax rate will remain at 46 cents and will not go up in the news fiscal year starting July 1.

Main Street district taxes will remain at 28 cents, while Seventh Avenue East district taxes will stay at 12 cents. 

SHERIFF TO OFFER HOUSE OF WORSHIP SAFETY AND SECURITY TRAINING

SHERIFF TO OFFER HOUSE OF WORSHIP SAFETY AND SECURITY TRAINING

The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office will be offering a House of Worship Safety and Security Class free of charge for any and all churches to attend. This presentation will assist church leaders and congregation members in making their place of worship a safe and peaceful place. 

 

Topics to be discussed will include the types of threats facing churches today, how to develop an action plan, and what to do in the event of an incident or attack.  The two hour training session will include a question and answer portion and guidance on how to develop plans and procedures appropriate to the participants’ individual organization.

 

The public has two opportunities to attend this training.  Classes have been scheduled for Thursday, May 26 and Thursday, June 9. Both classes will be held from 6-8pm at the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office located at 100 North Grove Street.  Representatives from each interested organization are asked to reserve spots for themselves and their attendees by following the instructions below.  Please RSVP no later than one week before the scheduled class.

Please send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and include:

  • ·Name
  • ·Church/Organization Name
  • ·Total number of attendees
  • ·Contact telephone number
  • ·Contact email address
  • ·Date you/your group are planning on attending

A reservation form can also be accessed on the Sheriff’s Office webpage at: http://www.hendersoncountync.org/sheriff/documents/SCOREClassRSVPForm.pdf

ALE TARGETS GAMING DEVICES IN 20 WNC STORES WITH 115 SEARCH WARRANTS STATEWIDE

ALE TARGETS GAMING DEVICES IN 20 WNC STORES WITH 115 SEARCH WARRANTS STATEWIDE

 GAMING DEVICES REMOVED FROM CONVENIENCE STORES...AND FRON STORES IN HENDERSONVILLE

 Alcohol Law Enforcement agents removed gaming machines from Western North Carolina convenience stores during statewide gambling crackdown on Thursday, according to an ALE spokesperson.

Norm's Minit Mart stores on Old Spartanburg Highway and Dana Road in Hendersonville as well as Time Out Market on Old Balsam Road in Waynesville were involved in the raid. There may have been more mountain convenience stores involved.

The raid was part of a statewide operation to remove illegal gaming machines with 115 search warrants executed on Thursday, ALE spokesperson Shannon O'Toole said.

O'Toole saiid tips from members of the community led to certain stores being raided.

Stores with illegal gaming machines are often prone to robberies, attract drug activity, and make customers feel "uncomfortable," O'Toole said.

"No arrests were made [on Thursday], but there will be arrests in the future," O'Toole said. 

Investigations will continue into the accusations made against the conventicle store owners.

COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD WANTS LAPTOPS FOR ALL HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS...AND EVENTUALLY FOR ALL MIDDLE GRADE STUDENTS

COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD WANTS LAPTOPS FOR ALL HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS...AND EVENTUALLY FOR ALL MIDDLE GRADE STUDENTS

 In a budget workshop Wednesday at the Mills RiverAcademy, the Henderson County School board was presented with a plan to buy laptop computers for all high school students in the county system…and eventually for all middle grade students.

HendersonCounty commissioners will be asked by the school board to provide $600 thousand per year for the net four years to purchase those Google Chrombooks.

The school board asked for $1.5 million last year to buy computers for all high school seniors…and the commissioners denied that request because it would have required a property tax increase.

The school board’s preliminary budget for the new fiscal year starting July 1is $25.9 million…that includes money for the computers…and  that’s up $1.3 million over the current fiscal year’s county school budget.

This comes with the county facing $100 million in capital construction needs, much of it for schools, and after the county manager proposed to commissioners this week a county budget for next year with NO property tax increase.

But the implication was clear that if the proposed quarter cent sales tax is not approved by voters this November, a property tax increase is probably inevitable.

By WHKP Ndews Director Larry Freeman

 

SALUDA SALUTES THE ARTS AND ARTISTS DURING MAY

SALUDA SALUTES THE ARTS AND ARTISTS DURING MAY

In recognition and celebration of the art community in Saluda during the month of May, the Saluda Historic Depot will present Saluda Art Legends-Past & Present in the Saluda Historic Depot.More than 17 artists living and passed will be represented in an exhibit in the depot with an opening reception May 7, 6:30pm to 8:30pm at the Saluda Historic Depot, 32 W Main Street, Saluda, NC.Some of the work exhibited will be for sale and some will be on loan from family members. 50% of the proceeds from sales will go toward the purchase of the depot and creation of a heritage and train museum.

“The month of May is all about the arts in Saluda,” says organizer Cathy Jackson.  “When the first passenger train rolled into Saluda on July 4, 1878, artists started coming to Saluda to get away from the sweltering heat from the lower country and discovered Saluda’s bountiful beauty and cool mountain breezes. Visual artists, performing artists, and writers built a community here and it is still a growing part of Saluda’s culture.”  We salute them in May with the Saluda Arts Festival on May 21 and we also wanted to recognize where it all began with the Saluda train depot exhibit of Saluda artists who are celebrated throughout the country, both those living and those who have passed, and left a legacy of art in Saluda,” says Cathy.

Exhibiting at the depot in May will be:

Bonnie Bardos "Art for me is an expression of the soul: the deepest self, where time and place do not matter...I am on a higher plane when creating. There is intense spirit and energy in my hands...I am influenced by color, by thought, and by the natural world around us." Bonnie's work is ethereal, you want to be a part of its softness, and light and somehow have it leave with you; become a part of you. Her paintings are pure loveliness. Jim Carson Jim Carson was the managing partner in the law firm of  Chambless, Higdon and Carson, in Macon, Ga., where he  practiced law for 31 years. Although always interested in drawing, even at an early age, Jim’s interest in art was dormant while law school, marriage, raising a family, and building a law practice took precedent. Jim’s wife gave him a painting course for Christmas in 1989. The art journey culminated in 2003, when Jim retired from law practice, moved to Saluda, N.C., and now paints full time.  Jim is known for his creative color balance and bold and spontaneous brushwork. Jim is a Signature Member of The American Impressionist Society, a member of Plein Air Painters of the Southeast (PAP-SE), and an Associate Member of Oil Painters of America. Jim won the Associate Member Award of Distinction in the 2015 National American Impressionist Society Exhibition.

Marguerite Hankins is known for her paintings inspired by old photographs and this is her passion. She is challenged by bringing the details of photographs to life, and especially enjoys capturing the fabric and design of old clothing and period costumes and figures in landscape settings. She is a gifted portraitist and captures the character of her subjects through their eyes and weathered faces. Still life painting rounds out her repertoire of favorite things to paint.Anne Jameson The simple rural life and colorful landscapes of the Carolinas have long fascinated Anne Jameson. She enjoys rural structural subjects particularly for the graphic design aspects of a composition but also for the wonderful color, and she enjoys the opportunity for some interesting plays of light and shadow which can provide drama or mystery to a painting. She and her husband William Jameson  often host workshops in Mexico and Italy and much of that is represented in their works in addition to the local scenery.

William Jameson,  Bill’s passion for history and nature allow him to create introspective landscapes embodying the full range of local color and timeless contrasts, whether the setting captures the brilliant, warm colors heralding the arrival of fall in the North Carolina Mountains or the rich Tuscan countryside. A prolific painter, Bill continues pursuing his explorations of landscapes. He expresses his creative drive in this way, “The more I paint, the more I must paint. The need to…is never diminished by having completed a painting, but rather there’s an immediate need to begin another.”Dale McEntire,  A native of Western North Carolina, Dale McEntire has been involved in the visual arts since his training at Mercer University, and has continued to evolve as an artist through private studies in the U.S. and Europe, and training at Penland School of Craft. His interest in the spiritual essence of nature can be seen in his use of color and form. Dale produces both oil and pastel paintings and sculpture (stone, steel, glass, bronze) out of his studio in Saluda, North Carolina. Beverly Pickard, After attending Rhodes College in Memphis, Beverly later received her BA in art from the University of South Carolina. She taught art for many years before she returned to school and earned a graduate degree in Marriage and Family Therapy; the field she worked in for 19 years, but she retired early to paint full time. Beverly's delightful subject matter includes local scenes and landscapes, as well as stunning still life’s that evoke feelings of nostalgia. A summer resident for many years, Beverly and her husband Carey returned to Macon, GA after living in Saluda for more than 10 years full time.

Bill Ryan An artist and teacher, Bill graduated with a combined art and English literature degree from the College Of William And Mary in Williamsburg., Virginia, and continued studies at the University Of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Bill moved to Charleston, SC in 1970 and taught in the public school system there. Since moving to Saluda in 1981, Bill concentrated on watercolor and oil landscapes of this area, and is worked on a series of seasonal floral arrangements inspired by the catalogues of English and American horticulturists of the 18th century. “I was once accused of ‘painting for the people,’” he says, “Of course I do! All artists do that- we simply choose different audiences.  All art is communication, and art that does not communicate is not art." Bill passed away in February, 2013.Johnny Waddill  An artist at birth, Johnny was encouraged by teachers and parents and

landed at Parsons School of Design. Working as a furnishings designer for years, he soon realized South Carolina was a better place to raise his family and soon became a painter of wildflowers, animals, fish, birds, snakes and landscapes. John continued to paint for pleasure and enjoyed learning from others; Rich Nelson, Dale McIntyre, Bill Jameson, and Jim Carson. He learned from a teacher years ago "If you ain't having fun you are wasting your and my time."  John followed that principal until his death in March, 2013.

Ray Pague, Ray Pague’s passion for art started when he was young.  At the age of 12 he won a TV in a drawing competition on TV.  At 14 his father bought him an art correspondence course.  His favorite artists include Vermeer, Rembrandt and Cassatte.  Ray has a varied history in art with experience as an illustrator before focusing on fine art.  A student of drawing and painting, his teachers have included Jim Greenshere, Daniel Greene,  Anne Schuler, and James P. Pyle.  He enjoys various mediums including oil and acrylic. His most popular work has been Saluda landmarks and street paintings of Main Street in Saluda.

Mark Gardner,  Mark’s love for making things out of wood started at the age of 16 from his Dad who made furniture as a hobby.  After studying woodworking and cabinet making at the University of Cincinnati, Mark gives credit to John Jordan at Arrowmont School for Arts and Crafts for giving him a firm foundation of turning techniques. Inspired by the work by woodturner Clay Foster and furniture maker Kristina Madsen whose works are heavily carved with African and Fijian motifs, Mark’s own work has been influenced by  African and Oceanic art.  Another important influence on Mark’s work has been Stoney Lamar, a woodturner/sculptor.  Working side by side with Stoney for six years, Mark learned how Stoney uses a lathe to sculpt and carve opposed to a tool for making round/symmetrical objects.  This perspective inspired Mark to experiment with other tools.  Over the last couple years his work has begun to shift from work based solely on turned forms to work that is made with even more direct methods such as chainsaws and power planers and grinders.

Judith CheneyJudith studied French in college so she could go and live in Paris and hang-out at the Louvre and sit around in cafes sketching. Judith calls her work "Story-telling in Paint" for each of her richly detailed paintings does just that. Her colorful canvases include the animals and birds, flowers, trees and old houses which are among her favorite things. She loves the changing seasons and paints spring orchards, summer picnics, blazing falls, and the wintry world after a snowfall with equal joy and zest. She also loves to paint moonlit scenes and drizzly, foggy Februarys and ever since her Florida days- glorious tropical jungles and sea sides.  Judith lives these days in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina and is inspired by the natural splendor which abounds in the area.

Paul Koenen, Retiring from the US Marines reserves after 25 years of service with the rank of Lt. Colonel, Paul and his wife, Christine settled in Chicago in 1957 where he continued his studies at the American Academy of Art. There he was inspired by a watercolor class taught by Irwin Shapiro. Paul worked in Chicago for 30 years as an advertising artist, art director and later, Director of Marketing Communications at American Hospital Supplies. In 1987, he and Chris moved to Saluda, North Carolina where he pursued painting and enthusiastically began teaching Watercolor. Paul Koenen was a signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina. He designed and built numerous sets for the Tryon Fine Arts Center, designed six of the Morris the Horse Christmas ornaments and helped found an art gallery in Asheville, NC.  He is well known for his paintings of downtown Saluda and Saluda Library which he sold prints of with all proceeds going to the Saluda Library. Paul passed away October, 2013.

Bunny Steffens, Bunny Steffens started drawing as a child and in her early 30’s she started to take painting very seriously. She excelled in her portrait work. There wasn't a medium that she didn't use, pastels, oil wash, watercolor, charcoal, acrylic and of course oil. The art critic from the Chicago art institute once told her to concentrate on her "nudes,” but she loved so many aspects of painting that she had to do it all. She had several one man shows in Florida, (Hollywood, Dania and Bradenton), and in Tryon. Her favorite role was as wife to her beloved Ted, husband of 54 years, mother to her children Ted and Mary, and a special role and love for her dear granddaughter, Jennifer. Bunny and Ted bought their home in Saluda in 1966, after spending many summers and retired here in 1983. Bunny was very involved in life in this wonderful little town. She was president of the Women's Club of Saluda, a very active member of the Garden Club, and Women of the Church. She also tutored reading at Saluda Elementary school.  Her family is so proud of her work and her life and appreciates the opportunity to share her love of art with the community that she loved so much.

Joe Adams,  Joe is a folk art aficionado and storyteller. His collections of “Outsider and Folk Art” were exhibited in his three galleries, America Oh Yes in Washington, DC, Asheville, NC, and Hilton Head, SC. He still has a collection of work at his Saluda summer resident and has generously donated a couple of his paintings to this exhibit. His collections include the best of Willey Masseys from the Smith Collection, art from Gitter-Yellen Collection, the Oh Appalachia Collection, Warrant and Sylvia Lowe Collection, the James Smith Pearce Collection and many more. Joe is also an author of the book, “Butterbeans for the Soul.”

Sylvia Jones, a collection of Sylvia Jones watercolor prints featuring Saluda scenes of Charlie Ward, the 611 passenger train, Thompson’s Store and M.A. Pace General Store will be on exhibit.

Charles Hearon, Charles O. Hearon, Jr. (1911-2007) was brought to the Saluda Baby Hospital in 1913 from Spartanburg. Since then,  he and his family returned to Saluda each summer.  In retirement,  he became a student of water color painting.  From his nature- filled youth, he knew all the details of his subject matter.  He painted and wrote about what he loved. Saluda's creeks, trains, store merchants, summer people, and flora were all subject matter for his brush and 'C Boy' became his signature, his childhood name.   Early on a cold, November morning at age 96, he drove his horse pulling a wagon filled with lumber, yet one more time up Howard's Gap, not to his beloved Saluda, but beyond.

About the Depot

The depot sits on historic Main Street at the crest of the steepest mainline standard gauge railroad in the United States.  The depot building is a contributing structure on the National Register of Historic Places in the listing for the Saluda Main Street Historic District.    

The Saluda Historic Depot organization is raising money to purchase the building and is working with the Historic Saluda Committee to make it Saluda's historic museum to highlight the history of the railroad, Saluda's downtown, its people, and the history of its natural resources.  

If you would like to climb aboard and help preserve the historic Saluda Depot for future generations, you can send donations or pledges to Saluda Historic Depot, PO Box 990, Saluda, NC 28773 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  All donations are tax deductible.