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UNITED WAY'S "DAY OF CARING" SET FOR FRIDAY

UNITED WAY'S "DAY OF CARING" SET FOR FRIDAY

GOOD WEATHER AND GOOD PARTICIPATION EXPECTED

This year's first annual "Day of Action". held late this summer, had over 500 volunteers involved....many of them helping collect school supplies for "back to school"

Day of Caring Set for September 30
Friday, September 30th will be a great day to LIVE UNITED as dozens of service projects around the county will be completed to benefit Henderson County non-profit organizations during this year's Day of Caring. 
 
UWHC has been accepting project submissions from any area non-profit organizations, schools, or government agencies. Last year, almost 300 Day of Caring volunteers spent a cumulative 1,390 hours working at 39 different projects with 30 of our local non-profit agencies. 
 

FARM CITY DAY RETURNS TO JACKSON PARK THIS SATURDAY

FARM CITY DAY RETURNS TO JACKSON PARK THIS SATURDAY

Fall signals the return of the long-standing county event Farm City Day. Since 1955 this unique event has captured the hearts of children and adults of all ages. It brings farm life and history to the city as well as helping build a stronger alliance between the two communities.

The festivities will be held at Jackson Park in Hendersonville on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Attendees have the opportunity to milk a cow, purchase crafts and see demonstrations by a quilter, blacksmiths, woodworkers and potters. The event also features three stages of local bluegrass music and cloggers.

The youth area will feature 4-H Club activities, farm animal petting, pony rides and fishing. Be sure to experience a hay wagon ride and old-fashioned games. For a small fee you can even try your luck with the Apple Sling or enjoy food from local vendors.

Many members of local fire, rescue, sheriff's and police departments will be on hand with educational displays to offer an up-close look at their trucks and equipment.

Do you like farm equipment? If so, come see the antique displays of engines, cars and farm tools. There will be modern farm equipment from local dealers. For the small-tractor enthusiast, there will be a Kiddie Tractor Pull.

This year organizers will honor some very special folks during the opening ceremonies — Spence Campbell for his dedication and year of service, and Theron and Mary Lois Maybin as Farmers of the Year.

This is only a small portion of all the excitement and festivities available this year. There is no admission charge and parking is free.

The event is sponsored by Pepsi, United Community Bank, Kiwanis Club of Hendersonville, Farm Bureau, Flavor 1st, Harris Teeter, Rotary Club of Hendersonville, Agribusiness Henderson County, Turf Mountain Sod, North River Farms.

For more information, contact the Henderson County Cooperative Extension Center at 828-697-4891 or Henderson County Parks and Recreation at 828-697-4884.

"THE SANCTUARY AT EAGLE'S NEST" COMING TO HORSE SHOE

"THE SANCTUARY AT EAGLE'S NEST" COMING TO HORSE SHOE

ZONING NEEDS TO BE CHANGED TO "MIXED USE"    

COMMISSIONERS GET THEIR FIRST LOOK AT THE PROJECT IN DECEMBER    

PLANS CALL FOR IT TO BE COMPLETE IN TWO YEARS  

 A 225-unit residential community is coming to the Horse Shoe area, according to a release Tuesday from Miami-based The Turchin Companies. The community will be "a next-generation concept centered on wellness and fun forever to create a better you."

To be called "The Sanctuary at Eagles Nest Horse Shoe Farm," the rental community will be constructed at the former Horse Shoe Farm on Horse Shoe Farm Drive, off South Rugby Road, on an 86-acre lot stretching to the French Broad River.

 

The development will be "an inspired residential community focused on healthy living for families and individuals searching to maintain an active lifestyle," according to the release. "The project will feature 225 cottage-style units with property amenities to include an on-site farm-to-table restaurant, wellness spa/center, farm library, art and music studios, and much more."

The development is the latest venture for John Turchin, head of The Turchin Companies, which was founded in the 1920s. The company has constructed more than 200 high-rise structures in the Miami area and over $1 billion in projects, according to the release.

GROUND IS BROKEN FOR THE NEW INNOVATIVE HIGH SCHOOL

GROUND IS BROKEN FOR THE NEW INNOVATIVE HIGH SCHOOL

Groundbreaking Ceremony Signals New Era of Education for Henderson County
 
Henderson County Commissioners, Blue Ridge Community College officials, and staff and board members representing Henderson County Public Schools turned the dirt on a project site Wednesday that’s been in the works for several years.
 
On the college campus site, officials celebrated a groundbreaking of the Innovative High School Building, which will be a combination of HCPS’ existing Henderson County Career Academy and Henderson County Early College – and serve as a model of community, college and public school system partnership for the state of North Carolina.
 
Set for completion by September 2017, “The Innovative High Schools Building will house nearly 500 students and will provide them access to Blue Ridge Community College instructors and facilities while offering a one-of-a-kind seamless transition from high school to postsecondary training,” said Blue Ridge Community College President Molly A. Parkhill.
 
The Career Academy and the Early College have similar visions but separate missions – both of which will be furthered by direct access to the college campus, HCPS Superintendent Bo Caldwell said.
 
The Henderson County Career Academy currently offers Art, Automotive, Business & Finance, Fire Fighting, Food Service and Mechatronics academies to high school students pursuing direct, specific career goals unavailable in a traditional high school setting.
 
The Henderson County Early College gives many first-generation college students the opportunity to complete high school and college coursework through Blue Ridge Community College in five years, and graduate with both a diploma and an associate’s degree.
 
“Thanks to the guidance of the Henderson County Board of Education and the generosity of our county commissioners, we as a school system are excited to see the success of this collaborative process championed by Dr. Parkhill and former Superintendent David Jones to serve two very student-centered school communities,” Caldwell said.
 
The 50,000-square-foot facility designed by Clark Nexsen of Asheville will be located just off of East Campus Drive on Blue Ridge’s Henderson County Campus, and is being constructed by Beverly Grant Barnhill. The total projected cost is $15,725,184.
 
"This is indeed a great partnership," said Henderson County Board of Commissioners Chairman Tommy Thompson. "These students will have a direct pathway into higher education and local jobs. This is truly a great day for Henderson County."
 
“It will be a win-win for both our campus and community,” said Parkhill.
 

LOCAL SCULPTOR JAMES SPRATT DIED LAST WEEK

LOCAL SCULPTOR JAMES SPRATT DIED LAST WEEK

In the photo, sculptor James Spratt is holding the likeness he created of the late James T. Fain who, for most of his lifetime, was editor of the Hendersonville Times-News.

In the main lobby of WHKP’s “Broadcast House”, there’s a bronze statue of the late broadcaster and community leader Kermit Edney.  That skillfully crafted likeness and dozens of others were the handiwork of sculptor James Spratt.  Spratt died late last week after a long battle with cancer.

According to Hendersonville Lightning, Spratt died on Friday…just one day before a life-sized bronze statue, created by Spratt, of Korean War Medal of Honor recipient Charles George was to be dedicated at the V.A.MedicalCenter in Oteen.  The cancer treatment Spratt received at that medical center inspired him to sculpt the life-size image of George who, in 1954, was posthumously awarded the nation’s highest honor for gallantry and outstanding courage during the Korean War.

Spratt was a native of Henderson County and a graduate of West Henderson High School.

 

 

57TH ANNUAL ART ON MAIN FESTIVAL IS THIS SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

57TH ANNUAL ART ON MAIN FESTIVAL IS THIS SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

The Arts Council of Henderson County presents its 57th annual Art on Main Fine Art / Fine Craft Festival.

Stroll Historic Downtown Hendersonville, NC, and shop for fine art and fine craft by artists from the Southeastern region and beyond. Media includes work in clay, metal, glass, fiber, wood, painting, photography, jewelry, etc. Art on Main also features live art demonstrations by local artists and artisans.

The festival takes place along Hendersonville's charming and historic Main Street.

  LOCAL MAN WINS ONE MILLION DOLLARS!

LOCAL MAN WINS ONE MILLION DOLLARS!

in the North Carolina Education Lottery    

When he reaslized he'd won, "I got into my truck and locked the door!"   

For Steven Tuttle of Flat Rock, the recent gas shortage almost cost him a $1 million lottery prize.

He usually gets his gas at the Ingles on Highland Lake Road in Flat Rock, but had stopped going there when the price rose during the shortage.

“I almost didn’t stop,” Tuttle said. “When I saw that the price of gas had dropped back down, I turned around.”

While he was there, Tuttle decided to get a $1,000,000 Bonus Cash scratch-off ticket.

He scratched the $10 ticket while getting gas. When he realized he won, Tuttle was so shocked he stopped filling up his tank.

“I didn’t know what to do,” Tuttle said. “I got into my truck and locked the door. To think I came that close to not stopping.”

He claimed his prize Monday at lottery headquarters in Raleigh. Tuttle had the choice of taking a $1 million annuity that has 20 payments of $50,000 a year or a lump sum of $600,000. He chose the lump sum and after federal and state tax withholdings received $415,503.  He plans to use the money to pay off his house.

$1,000,000 Bonus Cash launched in July with four top prizes of $1 million. Two top prizes remain.

Ticket sales from games like $1,000,000 Bonus Cash made it possible for the 

WNC GAS SUPPLIES ARE BACK UP---AND SO ARE PRICES

WNC GAS SUPPLIES ARE BACK UP---AND SO ARE PRICES

 Average retail gasoline prices in Gebdersonville and Asheville have risen 3.7 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $2.28/g yesterday, according to GasBuddy's daily survey of 259 gas outlets in the Hendersonville-Asheville area. This compares with the national average that has fallen 0.7 cents per gallon in the last week to $2.20/g, according to gasoline price website GasBuddy.com.

Including the change in gas prices in Asheville during the past week, prices yesterday were 10.1 cents per gallon higher than the same day one year ago and are 12.6 cents per gallon higher than a month ago. The national average has decreased 1 cent per gallon during the last month and stands 8.4 cents per gallon lower than this day one year ago.

According to GasBuddy historical data, gasoline prices on September 26 in Asheville have ranged widely over the last five years:
$2.17/g in 2015, $3.40/g in 2014, $3.39/g in 2013, $3.79/g in 2012 and $3.43/g in 2011.

Areas nearby Asheville and their current gas price climate:
Spartanburg- $2.13/g, up 3.0 cents per gallon from last week's $2.10/g.
Knoxville- $2.07/g, up 2.1 cents per gallon from last week's $2.05/g.
Greenville- $2.15/g, down 4.1 cents per gallon from last week's $2.19/g.

Overall, gas prices across the U.S. begin the week moving lower in 40 of 50 states.

"It's been almost a week since service has been restored to Colonial Pipeline's Line #1, a major gasoline source for the southeast and Atlantic seaboard..." said Gregg Laskoski, senior petroleum analyst for GasBuddy. "While it appears that retail gas prices have peaked in 4 of the 6 states hit hardest (AL, GA, NC, SC, TN, VA) by the pipeline damage & shutdown, and those averages are now ebbing lower, statewide averages continue to climb in two states: Tennessee ($2.16/gal) and Virginia ($2.10/gal). Those states' averages were at $2.14 and $2.08 respectively on Sept. 20th, the day before service was restored.

"While it appears that the worst may be behind us, we're not out of the woods yet, where gasoline inventory levels are concerned," he added. "The overall drop in gasoline inventory tied to Colonial Pipeline was approximately 8.5 million barrels. To put that in perspective, in the two weeks following Hurricane Katrina, east coast gasoline inventories shed 3.3 million barrels."

THE NEW HHS---IT'S ABOUT TIME:  A WHKP STATION EDITORIAL

THE NEW HHS---IT'S ABOUT TIME: A WHKP STATION EDITORIAL

THE NEW HHS---IT’S ABOUT TIME

A WHKP Station editorial

Reports are in the news that a new campus for Hendersonville High School has been in the design stage now for some time, and that construction on it could start as early as next year.

But there are a lot of issues that appear to be unresolved, and questions that are unanswered pertaining to that new facility and whatever turns out to be the NEW Hendersonville High School that will cost the taxpayers well in excess of $50 million.

Will the new campus be the Clark Nexsen design that county commissioners earlier this year signed off on and that, according to senior county officials, is moving forward as we speak?  Or will it be the Carey O’Cain-alumni association alternative that keeps the historic Stillwell building in use?  Or will it be some compromise combination of those two plans?

We’ve always known that it’s a “given” the Stillwell building will not be torn down…but how will it be used…as classrooms, as a new location for county school’s central office, or for some other community purpose?  In a letter to county commissioners reported late last week, even through the Clark Nexsen plan is reportedly well underway with a lot of time and money being invested in planning and design, the county school board wants the Stillwell building to be fully renovated and restored, wants it used for classrooms, and does not want it used for the school system’s central offices.

But the biggest question of all is still hanging out there…WHO will make these decisions, and chart a definitive course toward a new or renovated HendersonvilleHigh School?  Will it be the county commissioners, who control the money?  Or the school board, who has statutory authority over school facilities?  We even saw one report a while back that HHS Principal Bobby Wilkins would be the one to decide how the Stillwell building will figure in to all this.

For the community, for HHS students, parents, staff and alumni---for all of us---it’s almost as confusing, and ironically comical, as the old Abbott and Costello “Who’s on first?” routine.

A few things ARE for sure, though.  Whatever is done, will cost county taxpayers well over $50 million…andl by he time renovation or restoration costs for the Stillwell building are figured in, the whole thing may well be in excess of $70 million and the debt services on it will be part of that nickel property tax increase we all many start paying this year.

The bottom line for us is…it’s about time all the questions we’ve just raised, and that the whole Hendersonville community has been asking now for months, get answered…and that whatever is going to be done finally gets started.

We like the commissioner’s commitment to building for the NEXT 100 years.  But we also understand the community’s emotional attachment to the hallowed traditions of the school and the Stillwell building of the LAST 100 years.  And we accept the possibility that as the old saying goes, “never the twain shall meet.

But surely…there are enough thinking heads involved in this process to come up with answers, a solution, and…for crying out loud…to FINALLY decide on something going toward continued great education at Hendersonville High School, whatever and where ever is in the best interests of the students of the school, now and for generations to come, and by whomever makes the decision.  IT’S ABOUT TIME!

As always, we invite your comments…on our comments.

By WHKP News Director Larry Freeman

 

 

NC AG COMMISSIONER TELLS WHKP NEWS THAT MORE IMPROVEMENTS, PARKING, AND RE-SURFACING ARE COMING TO WNC AG CENTER

NC AG COMMISSIONER TELLS WHKP NEWS THAT MORE IMPROVEMENTS, PARKING, AND RE-SURFACING ARE COMING TO WNC AG CENTER

A week after a very successful 2016 WNC Mountain State Fair closed at the WNC Ag Center in Fletcher, North Carolina Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler told WHKP News that more improvements are coming to the facility on the busy Highway 280 across from the Asheville Regional Airport.

With improvements already underway, and in some cases already completed, to the arenas and other parts of the Ag Center, Troxler told WHKP News, ion an exclusive interview, that parking is the big issue at the Ag Center.

The venue needs another one thousand parking spaces, said Troxler, and immediate steps are being taken for 500 more.

He said the Ag Center, which provides a large agricultural and economic boost to Western North Carolina, will be working with the airport and other entities in the area to make more parking for the Ag Center available.  

The AG Commissioner also told WHKP News that visitors to the Ag Center will soon see the entire facility re-paved for further enhance parking and better access.

Troxler said he is committed to keeping agricultural research stations, such as the one on Old Fanning Bridge Road in Mills River, funded by the General Assembly and open.  Research, he said, is vital to the future of agriculture.

Even with shrinking acreage in production as farm land in the state, under his leadership, North Carolina’s Department of Agriculture is taking steps to ensure the future of small family farms in the state…and the Ag Commissioner cites the “Got To Be NC” program as an example.

Troxler and the Ag Department have also been deeply involved in  procuring and securing the future of the “donut hole” in Dupont State Forest.

Hear the full conversation with NC Ag Commissioner Steve Troxler and WHKP News Director Larry Freeman Saturday morning October 1st at 7:30 and Sunday morning October 2nd at 10:05 on WHKP AM 1450 and FM 107.7 and on your computer at whkp.com (Listen Live).