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Current weather in Hendersonville, NC 32° Saturday's Weather
Cloudy & cold
HI: 38 LOW: 27
Your Forecast Ray's Weather

CLICK ON YOUR LOCATION FOR PREDICTED SNOWFALL TOTAL

PREDICTED TOTALS BY LOCATION; CONSTANTLY UPDATED

 

FRIDAY NIGHT SCOREBOARD

FRIDAY NIGHT SCOREBOARD

Mountain Heritage-30

Avery County-17

 

Asheville-46

North Buncombe-0

 

Franklin-42

West Henderson-13

 

Owen-35

Polk County-0

 

McDowell-33

Enka-28

 

Reynolds-42

Roberson-13

 

Mitchell-21

Madison-18

 

North Henderson-42

Brevard-34

 

Tuscola-38

East Henderson-34

 

Psgah-21

Smoky Mountain-0

 

Andrews-41

Cherokee-19

 

Murphy-49

Hayesville-13

 

Swain-56

Rosman-36

 

 

 

 

SHERIFF'S DEPARTMENT WARNS OF SCAM PHONE CALLS

The Henderson County Sheriff's Office has received several questions from citizens indicating they are getting phone calls from  “Sgt. Michael Snyder” with the Henderson County Sheriff's Office, Warrants Division. 

The citizens have been told they have outstanding warrants issued against them.  for missing jury duty and contempt of court. The caller goes on to advise them if they do not want to be arrested they must provide two Green Dot cards in the sum of $395.

Chief Deputy Frank Stout says this is a SCAM and citizens are advised not to respond to the caller or provide any credit card information. There is no such person that works for the Sheriff’s Office and please contact the Henderson county Sheriff’s Office and 828-697-4911 to report an incident of this nature.

 

 

FRIDAY 6PM UPDATE: SNOW PREDICTIONS:  A DUSTING TO AN INCH OF SNOW FOR HENDERSONVILLE; 3-5 INCHES FOR ASHEVILLE; 8-10 INCHES IN HIGHER ELEVATIONS

FRIDAY 6PM UPDATE: SNOW PREDICTIONS: A DUSTING TO AN INCH OF SNOW FOR HENDERSONVILLE; 3-5 INCHES FOR ASHEVILLE; 8-10 INCHES IN HIGHER ELEVATIONS

FROM THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

HEAVY SNOW IS EXPECTED OVER PORTIONS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA
MOUNTAINS TONIGHT THROUGH SATURDAY...

.A STRONG UPPER LEVEL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM IS FORECAST TO CROSS
THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS EARLY SATURDAY. VERY COLD AIR WILL
ACCOMPANY THE SYSTEM...ALLOWING SNOW LEVELS TO DROP ACROSS THE
HIGH TERRAIN OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA STARTING THIS EVENING. AS
THE SYSTEM EXITS TO THE EAST DURING THE DAY ON SATURDAY... STRONG
NORTHWEST FLOW WILL CONTINUE...RESULTING IN NUMEROUS SNOW SHOWERS
THROUGH AT LEAST SATURDAY AFTERNOON.

...WINTER STORM WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 8 PM THIS EVENING
TO 8 PM EDT SATURDAY...

* LOCATIONS...NORTH CAROLINA MOUNTAIN COUNTIES ALONG THE
  TENNESSEE BORDER FROM AVERY TO SWAIN.

* HAZARDS...HEAVY SNOWFALL.

* TIMING...RAIN WILL CHANGE OVER TO SNOW TONIGHT WITH SNOW LEVELS
  DROPPING TO THE VALLEY FLOORS BY DAYBREAK ON SATURDAY. NUMEROUS
  SNOW SHOWERS WILL LIKELY LINGER THROUGH THE DAY ON
  SATURDAY...BEFORE TAPERING OFF EARLY SATURDAY EVENING.

* ACCUMULATIONS...A DUSTING T0 1 TO 2 INCHES IN THE HENDERSONVILLE AREA; SNOW ACCUMULATION OF 4 TO 6 INCHES IN ASHEVILLE AREA.AND PERHAPS AS
  MUCH AS 10 INCHES ON WEST FACING PEAKS ABOVE 4000 FEET AND ALONG
  THE IMMEDIATE TENNESSEE BORDER.

* IMPACTS...THE HEAVY WET SNOW COMBINED WITH WINDY CONDITIONS
  COULD PRODUCE ISOLATED TREE AND POWER LINE DAMAGE. ROAD
  SURFACES MAY SEE SLIGHTLY LESS SNOW ACCUMULATION...BUT BRIDGES
  AND OVERPASSES WILL LIKELY REMAIN SNOW COVERED AND ICY.

* TEMPERATURES...IN THE UPPER 20S TONIGHT AND LOW TO MID 30S
  SATURDAY.

* WINDS...NORTHWEST 15 TO 25 MPH WITH GUSTS UP TO 45 MPH.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A WINTER STORM WARNING FOR HEAVY SNOW MEANS SEVERE WINTER WEATHER
CONDITIONS ARE EXPECTED. SIGNIFICANT AMOUNTS OF SNOW ARE FORECAST
THAT WILL MAKE TRAVEL DANGEROUS. ONLY TRAVEL IN AN EMERGENCY
FRIDAY NIGHT AND SATURDAY. IF YOU MUST TRAVEL...KEEP AN EXTRA
FLASHLIGHT... FOOD...AND WATER IN YOUR VEHICLE IN CASE OF AN
EMERGENCY.

THE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES INTO HUMAN REMAINS FOUND IN GREEN RIVER GORGE

THE INVESTIGATION CONTINUES INTO HUMAN REMAINS FOUND IN GREEN RIVER GORGE

OFFICERS ALSO WORK TO DETERMINE CAUSE AND TIME OF DEATH

"We are exhausting every lead", says Chief Deputy Frank Stout as the investigation continued Friday into the body of the unidentified middle aged black male found earlier in the week in Green River Gorge. 

Information was received late Wednesday from a kayaker on Green River that he had discovered some human remains near the edge of the Green River beneath the I-26 Peter Guice Bridge.

Acting upon that information,  members from the Blue Ridge Fire Department and Henderson County Sheriff's Office were able to locate and recover the body of a middle-aged black male Wednesday evening.

There was no identification with the body and the investigation continues.

Investigators were working with the medical examiner's office Thursday in an attempt to make positive identification and determine the time and exact cause of death.  An autopsy was perfed in Hendersonvillem but the body is being sent to Winston-Salem for further examination. 

Investigators are following up on  missing persons reports from the area as well as upstate South Carolina. Should anyone have information that could possibly lead to the identification of this person please contact the Henderson County Sheriff's office at 828-697-4911.

 

 

THIS YEAR'S DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME WILL END THIS SATURDAY NIGHT

THIS YEAR'S DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME WILL END THIS SATURDAY NIGHT

 

 

 

"WE SPRING FORWARD IN SPRING, AND FALL BACK IN FALL"

SET YOUR CLOCKS BACK ONE HOUR BEFORE GOING TO BED THIS SATURDAY NIGHT NOVEMBER 1...

EASTERN STANDARD TIME OFFICIALLY RETURNS AT 2AM ON SUNDAY NOVEMBER 2ND!

The end of Daylight Savings Time (DST) marks the day where people will have to bid farewell to longer days and expect longer nights.

On Nov. 2, 2014, people across the U.S., Canada, and some regions of Mexico will have to set their clocks back one hour. It is advised that before going to bed on Saturday, Nov. 1, it is best to set the clocks back so that, for example, 9 p.m. becomes 8pm. The exceptions to DST are Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and American Samoa.

Credit for Daylight Savings Time belongs to Benjamin Franklin, who proposed the idea in an essay in 1784, wherein he wrote that the time change in the spring could be a good idea to save candles.

During World War II, DST was imposed to save fuel. Since then, DST has been used on and off, with varying start and end dates. Currently, Daylight Savings Time begins at 2 a.m. on the second Sunday of March, and ends at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday in November.

Though the practice has resulted in helping people take advantage of the longer hours during the daytime for suited activities, there have been some studies that link a time change during the spring to an increase in heart attacks and car accidents.

According to the Huffington Post, the New England Journal of Medicine noted in a 2008 study that the incidence of heart attacks fell on a Monday after Daylight Savings Time ended.

Health experts recommend that people should go to bed early on Saturday and wake up at their usual time on Sunday. They also encourage heading outside for a short period of time for a dose of sunlight upon getting out of bed, and following a regular schedule throughout the day.

 

 

 

 

CITY TO HOLD SHRED DAY TUESDAY NOVEMBER 4TH AT PATTON PARK

CITY TO HOLD SHRED DAY TUESDAY NOVEMBER 4TH AT PATTON PARK

 

 

 

The City of Hendersonville will sponsor a secure, Shred Day for City residents on Tuesday November 4.

Shredding will b, from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., in the parking lot of Patton Park, 59 E. Clairmont Drive. American Security Shredding, Inc, will have their shredding truck in the parking lot to allow residents to dispose of sensitive materials. Residents of Hendersonville are invited to bring up to two boxes (or 50 lbs.) of paper items to be shredded. Suggested items to shred are financial statements, cancelled checks, credit card statements, payroll stubs, insurance forms, old tax returns, forms from doctor's offices, etc. This is not for businesses. The public can simply drop their documents off or stay and watch their documents destroyed. The event will happen rain or shine. If the shredding truck fills up before 10:30, the event will be over.

To make this part of a community outreach effort, the City is asking that residents coming to the event to bring items to donate to IAM. Suggested items are canned fruits & vegetables, canned chili & beef stew, stuffing mix, and canned hams.

For more information, contact Lu Ann Welter, City Planning, 828-697-3088 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

 

 

THE PEAK OF THE FALL COLOR SEASON IS CLOSE IN WNC

THE PEAK OF THE FALL COLOR SEASON IS CLOSE IN WNC

High Falls

THE ASHEVILLE CITIZEN-TIMES AND WESTERN CAROLINA UNIVERSITY SAY:  IT'S IME FOR OCTOBER'S FALL COLOR

Western North Carolina's annual fall color display should draw more tourists this October than last year when a federal government shutdown stymied some travelers, according to a new study from Western Carolina University.

With the national parks open and fall colors forecast to be especially good this year, hotel occupancy rates should increase in 21 mountain counties, according to the second annual "October Tourism Forecast for Western North Carolina."

The report is developed by students in a senior-level "Tourism Strategies" class taught by Steve Morse, economist and director of the Hospitality and Tourism Program in WCU's College of Business.

"The federal government shutdown during the first 15 days of October in 2013 resulted in little growth in tourism last year because of the closure of campgrounds and visitor centers in Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Blue Ridge Parkway," Morse said.

"Our analysis indicates those who did not travel to the mountains last October may have a stronger desire this year to feed their fall foliage yearning."

The students analyzed data supplied by Smith Travel Research, a leading source of information for the hospitality industry. The students' forecast also is based on declining gasoline prices, new tourism marketing campaigns by the Asheville Convention and Visitors Bureau and by Smoky Mountain Host promoting WNC as an outdoors destination, improving economic conditions and "pent-up travel demand," Morse said.

Another factor, Morse said, is the improving outlook for leaf-lookers in the mountains, as WCU fall foliage forecaster Kathy Mathews, associate professor of biology, says the chances are increasing for a brilliant fall color season this year. "Brighter colors should attract even more tourists this year," Morse said.

In the tourism study, the WCU students divided 21 WNC counties into five groups; examined the total number of hotel rooms sold and the overall occupancy rates for October 2013; compared weekday and weekend occupancy rates from last October; and determined the average change in the number of hotel nights sold for October during the previous three years. The students' predictions, by region:

Region 1 – Cherokee, Clay, Graham and Macon counties: A 2.7 percent increase in October 2014 tourism compared to last October.

Region 2 – Haywood, Jackson, Transylvania and Swain counties: A 3.3 percent increase in October 2014 tourism compared to last October.

Region 3 – Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Caldwell, Watauga and Wilkes counties: A 2 percent increase in October 2014 tourism compared to last October.

Region 4 – Burke, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell and Yancey counties: A 1.7 percent increase in October 2014 tourism compared to last October.

Region 5 – Buncombe and Henderson counties: A 3.7 percent increase in October 2014 tourism compared to last October.

Ty Marion, a senior from Hendersonville majoring in hospitality and tourism, said the project provided a new perspective on the annual fall color show. "Since the leaves start changing colors in early October and continue for the rest of the month, tourists travel from all over, which increases everything from the demand of hotel rooms to revenue," said Marion, a 2007 graduate of East Henderson High School.

The "October Tourism Forecast for Western North Carolina" is part of a series of reports about travel trends in the mountain region to be provided by Morse and his students.

For more information about WCU's Hospitality and Tourism Program, visit the website hospitalityandtourism.wcu.edu. For a copy of the tourism forecast report, call 828-227-3386.

 

 

NC COURT OF APPEALS COMES TO HENDERSONVILLE OCTOBER 20TH

NC COURT OF APPEALS COMES TO HENDERSONVILLE OCTOBER 20TH

 
 

 

The North Carolina Court of Appeals will hold a session of court in Hendersonville on Monday, October 20 at 1:00 p.m. The appeals court will sit in the former main courtroom (now used for meetings of the County Commissioners) of the Historic Courthouse in downtown Hendersonville, and will be open to the public.

            The court session was scheduled by the Court of Appeals, which usually holds court in Raleigh, after an invitation by the Henderson County Bar Association, the local group for Henderson County lawyers. “We’re very excited that the Court has accepted our invitation to visit Hendersonville,” said Bar Association President Anderson Ellis. “This is a terrific opportunity for the residents and students of Hendersonville to experience first-hand one of the higher levels of our state judicial branch. We hope that everyone will take advantage of the visit to become familiar with how our appeals court works.”

            In North Carolina, civil and criminal cases first go to trial in the District and Superior Courts, which are conducted in each county in the state. If a case is appealed from these courts, unless it is a murder case in which the death penalty is given, it is heard by the Court of Appeals. The Court reviews cases for errors of law and legal procedure, and its fifteen judges are elected and serve eight-year terms.

            The three-judge panel of Judges Linda McGee, Robert Hunter, and Sanford Steelman are set to hear two cases in Hendersonville. The first case, Bottom v. Bailey (COA 14-564), is an appeal from Buncombe County and addresses the mishandling of funds involved in a “check kiting” scheme. The second case, Town of Black Mountain v. Lexon Insurance Company (COA 14-740), is also an appeal from Buncombe County, and revolves around bonds issued for the construction of a subdivision that fell through due to the recession of 2008-2009. Each case has two parties, and each party is given 30 minutes to argue; each case will take approximately one hour, and the court session will run from 1:00 p.m. until approximately 4:00 p.m.

 

NEW DIRECTOR AT THE HISTORIC JOHNSON FARM

NEW DIRECTOR AT THE HISTORIC JOHNSON FARM

   

 

 Henderson County Public Schools and Historic Johnson Farm announcethat Joy Owens of Hendersonville, NC is theFarm Director.

Owens was hired after a search and interview process, and began work at the beginning of school year 2014-15. (She succeeds Farm Director Ingrid McNair who retired August 31, 2014)

 

Owens is a resident of Henderson County, anda product of Henderson County Public Schools. She attended Mills River Elementary School, Rugby Middle School and West Henderson High School.

 

She attended Furman University in Greenville, SC, graduating Magna Cum Laude with a BS Degree in Sustainability Science. During her time at Furman, she served as year-long manager of Furman Farm, an organic farm on campus. She supervised a staff of eight students in a work study program, and managed other student volunteers as well as volunteers from the Greenville community.

 

She also worked as an Education Intern with the Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site. While there she participated in the Climate Friendly Parks project, gave house tours, cared for animals, and was exposed to all aspects of the park and its education programs.

 

Owens is currently accepting reservations for school field trips at the farm. Since coming to Historic Johnson Farm, she has been involved in studying what the teams of farmvolunteers have done in the past. She is involved in organizing andputting her personal stamp on all the planned educational activities offered at the farm.

 

Owens started a Facebook page for the farm, to compliment and add to the farm website at www.historicjohnsonfarm.org.

Everyone associated with Historic Johnson Farm is looking forward to a bright future under her direction.

 

Historic Johnson Farm is open Tuesday – Friday from 8 am to 4 pm. There is no charge to walk the grounds. Visitors may enjoy one of the guided tours of the brick farmhouse, boarding house and other buildings at 10: am and 1:30 pm at $5 for adults, and $3 for children. Preschoolers are admitted free. It is located at 3346 Haywood Road, Hendersonville, NC across from Rugby Middle School. Call 828-891-6585 for more information.