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COUNTY ARCHITECT TO ADVISE COMMISSIONERS ON ARTIFICIAL TURF

COUNTY ARCHITECT TO ADVISE COMMISSIONERS ON ARTIFICIAL TURF

FOR HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC FIELDS   

All Four Henderson County high schools could have artificial turn on their athletic fields soon…if county commissioners authorize it…and the commissioner’s authorization will depend largely on what they’re told by the county’s architect, Chad Roberson.

At their meeting Wednesday, commissioners passed a motion asking the architect for as much information as possible relating to the cost and maintenance of artificial turf. Commission Chairman Michael Edney said the motion asked for the information on artificial turf versus the cost of natural grass and keeping grass on the fields all the time.

The school board has endorsed the artificial turf, if the funding for it is not needed for a higher priority.

Commissioners could get a report back from the architect, make a decision, and move to authorize the artificial turf as soon as this spring.

By Larry Freeman

 

 

LOCAL STATE TROOPERS STOP A SUICIDE & SAVE A LIFE

LOCAL STATE TROOPERS STOP A SUICIDE & SAVE A LIFE

Four State Troopers heroic actions saved the life of a young female in Henderson County on Tuesday, Feb. 14. Trooper Christopher Jeffries was on routine patrol when he was approached by motorist advising him they had observed a young female, possibly in her twenties, standing on the overpass of U.S. 25 which crosses over I-26. Trooper Jeffries immediately traveled to the location where he located the female, obviously distraught, standing on the southbound side of the U.S. 25 overpass.

After contacting Highway Patrol Communications requesting assistance from fellow patrol members, Jefferies approached the female. Seeing the female was upset and crying profusely, Jefferies engaged in conversation with her, attempting to calm her down. At one point during the conversation, the female sat down on the edge of the bridge while conversing with Jeffries. While attempting to develop a sense of security for the female, Jeffries stooped to both knees while continuously talking to her.

Placing his own life at risk, Jeffries seized an opportunity to grab the female’s arm to keep her from falling. Trooper Mark Corbin, who had heard the call for assistance, arrived on scene and assisted Jeffries by pulling the female to safety. Troopers Haley Onderdonk and Kyle Smith stopped the westbound traffic on I-26 during the incident. The female was placed into the custody of the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office where she was provided further assistance.

“The selfless acts of heroism demonstrated by these troopers make me proud to be a member of this fine organization”, said Colonel Glenn McNeill, commander of the State Highway Patrol. “Each day, officers across our country voluntarily place themselves in danger to save the life of another.”

For further information, please contact Sgt. Michael Baker, State Highway Patrol P.I.O. at 919-733-5027 or email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

AT SIERRA NEVADA:  SECOND ANNUAL BURLY BEER FEST SET FOR APRIL 1

AT SIERRA NEVADA: SECOND ANNUAL BURLY BEER FEST SET FOR APRIL 1

MORE THAN FIFTY BREWERIES WILL BE PARTICIPATING

The North Carolina Brewers Guild and Sierra Nevada Brewing Company will be warming things up this spring with the second Burly Beer Fest on April 1, sampling the best rich, robust beers from more than 50 breweries.

As the Burly Beer Fest website puts it, "Come raise your goblet to pay homage to the end of winter and warm your soul with the best burly ales. We’re toasting the spiced and the barrel aged, the stouts and the barleywines, and the big-hearted men and women who love them."

More than 50 breweries, including Bell's Brewery, Mikkeller, The Lost Abbey, 21st Amendment, Adroit Theory Brewing Co., The Duck-Rabbit Craft Brewery, Allaghash Brewing Co. and many local and North Carolina-based breweries, will bring their heartiest beers for the festival, said Lee-Ann Loser, events manager at Sierra Nevada.

Those breweries will bring the best they have to offer in the "burly beer" category, which includes imperials, stouts, barleywines, porters, barrel-aged beer and more, closing out the cold times with big, warming beers.

The fest will also be a way to expose people to beer styles they may not normally drink, people who don't naturally gravitate toward imperial stouts or barleywines, Loser said.

A live band, to be announced, is also planned, and those attending can see the live cooking station put on by the brewery's taproom staff or sample the eats from several food trucks slated to attend. So far trucks on the schedule include the newly founded Thai food truck Bun Intended and the grilled cheese-focused Melt Your Heart.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the NCCBG and its North Carolina craft beer-supporting mission.

A CELEBRATION OF HENDERSON COUNTY'S NEWEST BEVERAGE INDUSTRY:  CIDER JAM APRIL 22ND

A CELEBRATION OF HENDERSON COUNTY'S NEWEST BEVERAGE INDUSTRY: CIDER JAM APRIL 22ND

FIRST ANNUAL APPLE COUNTRY CIDER JAM SET FOR DOWNTOWN ON APRIL 22ND

Balsam Range is the lead bluegrass act for the first Apple Country Cider Jam, a hard cider festival expected to draw several hundred tasters to downtown Hendersonville on Saturday, April 22.

The festival, from 1 to 6 p.m., will be a ticketed event with cider tasting, bluegrass and food trucks. Sponsored by AgHC, the nonprofit that promotes farming in Henderson County, the festival is a cooperative effort of the city of Hendersonville and the county Tourism Development Authority.

ixteen local and regional cider producers in North Carolina have been invited to set up tasting booths. Henderson County has three hard cider makers — Bold Rock, Saint Paul Mountain Vineyards and Naked Apple, which operates Flat Rock Ciderworks on Main Street.

COUNTY SCHOOLS NAME NEW ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION

COUNTY SCHOOLS NAME NEW ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION

Dr. Jan King Named New Asst. Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction
HENDERSONVILLE, N.C. (Feb. 14, 2017) – During its regular board meeting Monday night, the Henderson County Board of
Public Education named Dr. Jan King the new Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction, effective March 1, following
the retirement of Dr. Kathy Revis.
“Dr. Kathy Revis leaves big shoes to fill and I am grateful for the many years she has served as a mentor to me,” said King.
King began her 24-year education career with HCPS as a classroom teacher at Dana Elementary, Apple Valley Middle, and West
Henderson High schools, then became a specialist for the Academically and Intellectually Gifted (AIG) programs at West
Henderson High, Hendersonville Middle, Bruce Drysdale Elementary and Edneyville Elementary schools.

King also served as an Instructional Coach for high schools, an Assistant Principal at Hendersonville High, and a Principal at
Glenn C. Marlow Elementary, during which time she won the district’s Principal of the Year award twice, and served as North
Carolina Principal of the Year during school year 2010-11.

In 2011, King moved to the N.C. Department of Public Instruction where she served as Professional Development Lead for
Region 8, and then Regional Lead for Regions 7 and 8 – where she served 37 school districts for three years. King returned to
HCPS in 2015 as Director of School Learning and Leadership Development and is currently Chief Professional Development
Officer, responsible for coordinating support for Beginning Teachers, Beginning Principals, the Aspiring Administrators program,
and ongoing professional development for teachers and administrators district-wide.
Superintendent Bo Caldwell said HCPS is lucky to have such an experienced educator serve as the district’s next Assistant
Superintendent for Curriculum & Instruction.

“What other person has such a wealth of knowledge of Henderson County Public Schools and North Carolina’s education
system?” Caldwell said. “Dr. King is the epitome of a homegrown educational leader.”

“It is an honor to continue to serve the students and staff of Henderson County Public Schools, and I am appreciative to Mr.
Caldwell and our Board of Education for this opportunity,” King said. “The Curriculum and Instruction team is comprised of a
dedicated group of professional educators, and I am eager to work with them as we support and encourage the district's hardworking
teachers."

In addition to a Master of Arts in School Administration from Gardner Webb University, King holds a Doctorate in Educational
Leadership from Western Carolina University, as well as her National Board teacher certification and school administrator
certifications.
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ETOWAH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GETS NEW PRINCIPAL

ETOWAH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GETS NEW PRINCIPAL

Matthew Haney Named New Principal at Etowah Elementary

Matthew Haney has been selected to succeed retiring Michael Thorpe as Principal at
Etowah Elementary, effective March 1.

Currently an Assistant Principal at Flat Rock Middle, Haney has taught, coached, and held administrative roles in public schools
throughout Western North Carolina since 1999, when he began his career in education with Haywood County Schools as a
technology education teacher and assistant football coach at Waynesville Middle School.

Haney also taught Metals Manufacturing Technology at Asheville High School, Technology Education at T.C. Roberson High
School, and served as assistant coach for T.C. Roberson’s football and track programs before returning to Haywood County
Schools in 2004 as Canton Middle School’s technology education teacher and head football coach.

After six years at the middle school, Haney was named Assistant Principal of Canton Middle, where he remained until 2013
when he continued his leadership at Pisgah High School as Assistant Principal. Haney joined Henderson County Public Schools
in 2015 as Assistant Principal at Flat Rock Middle and quickly demonstrated his leadership in education.

"I could not be more excited being named the new principal at Etowah Elementary,” Haney said. "It is an honor to be able to
serve such an amazing community of dedicated staff and students.”

“Etowah Elementary has a tradition of high student achievement and growth, and I look forward to continuing these efforts by
first focusing on building strong relationships with our staff, students and community,” said Haney.

Haney holds a Master of School Administration and Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology from Western Carolina
University.

INVASIVE PLANTS PROGRAM MONDAY FEBRUARY 27

INVASIVE PLANTS PROGRAM MONDAY FEBRUARY 27

Invasive species can take over your property quickly. Kudzu, wisteria, ivy, bamboo, and other vines and weeds can kill trees and are hard to eradicate. Landowners and landscapers can pick up some great tips and information on Monday, February 27, at 6 p.m., at Henderson County Library auditorium on Washington St. in downtown Hendersonville from two people who deal with invasives regularly. Speakers for “How To Control Those Pesky Invasive Plants on Your Property” -- David Lee, Natural Resource Manager, and Jennifer Adams, Habitat Restoration Associate, at Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy -- will describe ways to conserve the value of your land by using best practices for getting rid of those pesky invasives. The presentation is sponsored by the Hendersonville Tree Board and is open to the public at no charge.

The informative PowerPoint presentation will describe effective, safe methods of treatment and include visual and written materials, handouts, and plant samples.

Hendersonville Tree Board is commissioned by the City of Hendersonville to provide advice on the selection and care of trees and shrubs in public places. The Tree Board also educates the public on the economic and aesthetic benefits of trees and shrubs for the community. The Arbor Day Foundation has recognized Hendersonville as a Tree City USA for 24 years because of its high level of tree care. The city became a Bee City USA in 2015.

For more information, email Lee at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To learn more about Hendersonville Tree Board and its projects visit the webpage at http://cityofhendersonville.org/index.aspx?page=285. # # #

THE 2017 LOCAL FARMING SEASON IS GETTING UNDERWAY

THE 2017 LOCAL FARMING SEASON IS GETTING UNDERWAY

WEATHER AND ADEQUATE LABOR---THE TWO BIG CONCERNS   

LOCAL AGRICULTURE BUSY PREPARING---AND HOPEFUL---FOR 2017 FARMING SEASON

Henderson county apple grower Kenny Barnwell told WHKP News “I am concerned about having adequate labor every year.” Barnwell spoke with WHKP News about two major issues facing local agriculture---unpredictable and possibly devastating spring weather, and having adequate farm labor.

How the Trump Administration will handle the immigration issue and un-documented workers, mostly from Mexico, who plant, care for, and then harvest every local crop from berries to apples remains unclear. And growers are always concerned about ICE, or the Immigration Customs Enforcement people, swooping in on their fields and sending their labor back across the border.

Vegetable grower Kirby Johnson, who grows here in the summer and in Florida in the winter, says concern over labor is why he cut back last years, and will be cutting back some this year, on the total acres he’s farming.

Weather is the other big issue facing local growers. Kenny Barnwell, who grows both apples and peaches, says if the temperatures get too warm and the young apples begin to “bud” too soon, a late season frost or freeze can kill an entire crop. Normally, says Barnwell, local apple trees will begin to bloom by the first of April and will be in full bloom sometime in the first two weeks of April.

A value of $40 million was placed on Henderson County’s apple crop last years…which was described as “…not a full crop, but a good crop.”

Kirby Johnson says the abnormally warm winter has been a big concern for him and other vegetable growers and he’s hoping for more cold weather to slow things down some. He’s also worried about some predictions that this year may be a dry summer.

Johnson, who will be growing hundreds of acres of mixed tomatoes, beans, peppers and other vegetables in Henderson County, mostly in Mills River, this year…says all of his products are available at Ingles and Publix food stores…and of course at the Johnson Family Farm on Kanuga Road.

A lot more is grown and farmed in Hendersonb County, too...everything from livestock to herbs to plants and flowers, even Christmas trees.  Complete information, and where to buy it all, is available at southernmountainfresh.comn.

By WHKP News Director Larry Freeman   10am   02/13./17

 

 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS HAD BEEN ASKED TO WITHDRAW THEIR ULTIMATUM TO CITY COUNCIL TO CLOSE 9TH AVENUE FOR THE NEW HHS

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS HAD BEEN ASKED TO WITHDRAW THEIR ULTIMATUM TO CITY COUNCIL TO CLOSE 9TH AVENUE FOR THE NEW HHS

Hendersonville City Council member Ron Stephens told WHKP News over the weekend that county commissioners had been asked by city staff and by city council members to withdraw their request that part of Ninth Avenue West be closed...according to Stephens, city council must have the zoning of any property aubmitted and approved "...before we can agree to close any street."  Commissioners did not withdraw their request, city council delayed closing the street in their meeting last Thursday night, and the county commissioners reportedly backed up their ultimatum to the city late last week and put the whole $53 million dollar proposal on "ice" indefinitekly...and perhaps will sell the former Boyd property at Five Points on which must of the new campus would be located.

County commissioners gave the city the ultimatum some weeks ago to either close Ninth Avenue between Oakland and Church streets to make room for the new campus and approve the necessary zoning changes…or the whole proposed new campus would be delayed indefinitely and the former Boyd property, sold to the county some years ago clearlyfor the indicated purpose of a new Hendersonville High School campus, might be sold.

City council voted 3 to 2 last Thursday night to delay a decision on closing the street at least until May and, they said, until they learn more about the proposed new campus and the zoning changes, special use permits and variances that the new campus project will require.

The county was apparently making good on its ultimatum Friday…as the Times-News is quoting Commissioner Tommy Thompson as saying the county has already spent $500 thousand on the project and won’t spend any more until the city makes a decision on the street.

The paper is also reporting that those zoning changes were set to be submitted to the city next week, but that is now being “evaluated”. Thompson is also quoted as telling the newspaper that planned meetings with teachers and architects about the new campus will not go forward now.

The newspaper is quoting County Commissioner Charlie Messer as saying the counhty has spent a lot of time and "done their homework" on the new campus proposal…and the project either needs to get started or the county needs to move on to something else.

Referring to the county’s ultimatum and the commissioner’s reportesd decision Friday to back away from the new campus project, City Councilman Jeff Miller told WHKP News that.by supporting a delay in closing the street he had acted on the advice of the city attorney that if the city closed that portion of Ninth Avenue and the school was not built, the city might not get the street back. Miller, who made the motion to delay closing the street,  also said ”I am going to do what I think I should do and nothing less”, that his vote was not political at all, and it was exactly what he (Miller) felt he should do given the set of circumstances.  Miller has not been committed one way on the other on the school project, waiting to see if it complied with city ordinances and codes…but Mayor Barbara Volk and Council Members Ron Stephens and Jerry Smith were reportedly opposed to the new campus project.

City Council member Ron Stephens told WHKP News over the weekend that by delaying closing the street in their meting Thursday night council "...did not say or imply that we would not approve closing the street."  So, Stephens added, he was surprised and disappointed at the commissioner's decision to put the HHS project on ice.

 So, going into the weekend, was it appeared the county is making good on its threat and indefinitely delaying the new campus project and raiaing the possibility of selling the former Boyd property..

County commissioners are scheduled to meet at 9 Wednesday morning in the Historic Courthouse, and so far nothing pertaining to Hendersonville High School is on the agenda…but final approval of a new Edneyville Elemntary School is on the agendanwhich would clear the county to start work on that new school in Edneyville.

By Larry Freeman   Updated 5pm Sunday  02/12/17

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAN FALLS TO HIS DEATH SUNDAY AT BIG BRADLEY FALLS IN SALUDA

MAN FALLS TO HIS DEATH SUNDAY AT BIG BRADLEY FALLS IN SALUDA

The waterfalls of western North Carolina continue to be as deadly as they are beautiful. A man died Sunday afternoon when he fell over Big Bradley Falls near Saluda.

Reports say the man turned to be sure his daughters who were with him were safe, he then tripped over a root, and fell…some reports say as many was 120 feet.

An 18-year old reportedly tried to catch the man but could not.

The man was identified Monday as 47-year old Lance K. Healy of Charlotte.

Several dozen rescuers from Henderson and Polk Counties responded to the call late Sunday.

By Larry Freeman