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CHAMBER ANNOUNCES ATHENA AWARD NOMNINEES

CHAMBER ANNOUNCES ATHENA AWARD NOMNINEES

ATHENA Award Nominees Announced

The Henderson County Chamber of Commerce is proud to announce the following nominees for the 10th Annual ATHENA Award presented in memory of Vanessa Y. Mintz by Pardee Hospital, Morris Broadband and Judy Stroud/State Farm Insurance:

Tanya Blackford, Alice Cochran, Joanne Helppie, Lynn Killian, Denise Medved, Elizabeth Moss, Dot Moyer, Roxanna Pepper, Paige Posey, Amanda Stansbury, Hollie Storrier, and Fair Nabers Waggoner.

The nominees will be honored at a reception presented by Judy Stroud and State Farm Insurance on Tuesday, May 2nd. The winner of the 10th Annual ATHENA Award presented in memory of Vanessa Y. Mintz will be announced at the Business and Professional Women’s Luncheon on Wednesday, May 10th at Kenmure Country Club. The ATHENA Award honors individuals who strive toward the highest levels of personal and professional accomplishment, who excel in their chosen field, devote time and energy to their community in a meaningful way, and forge paths of leadership for other women to follow. The award is co-sponsored by the Henderson County Chamber of Commerce.

For more information on the ATHENA Award or to make your reservation to the Business and Professional Women’s Luncheon, please call the Chamber at 828-692-1413.

ARMED ROBBERIES AND HIGH SPEED CHASES:  DEPUTIES ANNOUNCE ARRESTS

ARMED ROBBERIES AND HIGH SPEED CHASES: DEPUTIES ANNOUNCE ARRESTS

 earn old Sarah Davidson, 24 year old Nathan Turner, 27 year old Chase Washington, and 16 year old Stacy Ward of Henderson County have all been charged with a recent armed robbery.  Deputies sat they may he charged with other recent robberies.

22 year old Benjamin Boaz is facing a number of serious charges after a high speed chase out Sugar Loaf Road all the way to the end of World's Edge Road.

 

 

 

RE-OPENING LATER THIS WEEEK; LOCAL CHICK FIL A MAKE-OVER TO BE COMPLETE BY APRIL 21ST

RE-OPENING LATER THIS WEEEK; LOCAL CHICK FIL A MAKE-OVER TO BE COMPLETE BY APRIL 21ST

MAKE-OVER ALMOST COMPLETE.  

Local folks looking for some good chicken and fixin's are having to look somehwere other than the Chick Fil A in Highland Square for a while.  

A major make-over, inside and outside the restaurant, is currently taking place...and plans are to have it all ready for re-opening on April 21st.  

Meanhile... Chick Fil A folks, on their Facebook page, are saying "thanks"...for a little help from their friends...

"So far our friends at McFarlan Bake Shop and Hubba Hubba BBQ have helped us surprise and delight the crew working on your Chick-fil-A of Hendersonville remodel while it's closed. A happy crew works harder and will keep us on schedule. It's worth a shot anyway don't you think?
We know these guys and gals work hard and do not get to enjoy this place we get to call home. So we thought we would do our best to bring home to them throughout the process. They loved the donuts and breakfast treats, and went on and on about the barbecue lunch that was catered by Starr and his crew. Make plans soon to enjoy lunch with them, you will not be disappointed."

Again, renovation should be complete by April 21st.

By Larry Freeman

 

 

 

LOCAL FARMER'S TAILGATE MARKETS OPENING FOR THE SEASON

LOCAL FARMER'S TAILGATE MARKETS OPENING FOR THE SEASON

MOST ARE OPEN MAY THROUGH OCTOBER  

FRESH LOCAL PRODUCE AND PRODUCTS; CONVENIENT LOCATION; COMPETITIVE PRICES; FRIENDLY FOLS  

SUPPORTING LOCALLY GROWN AND PRODUCED SUSTAINABLE AGRILCULTURE   

Agribusiness Henderson County - Southern Mountain Fresh is the official brand for locally grown, Henderson County farm-fresh products.The Southern Mountain Fresh web site offers a wide variety of local produce, fresh foods, plants and other agricultural products.

Henderson County Curb Market - All items sold at the market must be either hand-made or locally grown. The vendors offer a variety of goods such as: crafts, baked goods, jellies, plants, flowers, toys, and produce. Open 8am-2pm Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from April-December and Saturdays 8am-1pm January-March. 221 N. Church St., Hendersonville, NC (828) 692-8012

Henderson County Tailgate Market - Local, organic and conventional produce, bedding plants, flowers, herbs, baked goods, canned goods. Henderson County Building parking area- (between First and Second Avenues) 100 N. King Street, Hendersonville, (828) 693-7265 Saturdays: 8am - 12Noon, Open mid-April thru mid-November

Mills River Farm Market - Fresh local produce, cheeses, meats, jams & jellies, handmade arts & crafts and more; Saturdays 8am-12Noon, May to mid-October, 94 Schoolhouse Rd., Mills River, NC (828) 891-3332

Flat Rock Farmers Market - Fresh ocal and regional organic produce, fresh seafood, goat milk lotion, soap & cheeses, eggs, herbs, plants, flowers, wild & cultivated mushrooms, baked goods, honey, eggs, jelly, jams & relishes, annual, perennial & native plants. Location: Parking area behind the little rainbow stores on the corner of West Blue Ridge Road on Greenville Highway, 2720 Greenville Hwy., Flat Rock.Thursdays, 3-6pm, First Thursday in May – Last Thursday in October This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tuxedo Tailgate Market - Local vendors selling produce, baked goods, flowers, honey, and crafts. Located at the Tuxedo Park Hwy 225, Open May - October on Thursdays 4pm - 7pm, Tuxedo NC

Western North Carolina Farmers Market - Open to the public . Admission is free. The retail area features displays of fruits and vegetables, mountain crafts, jams, jellies, preserves, sourwood honey, and dozens of other farm fresh items. Open daily 8am-6pm, April-October; 8am-5pm, November-March. 570 Brevard Rd., Asheville, NC (828) 253-1691

For more information and U-Pick farms visit the Buy Appalachian web site at www.buyappalachian.org

QUESTIONS ABOUT WATER RATE LEGISLATION FOR REPRESENTATIVE CHUCK MCGRADY---AND HIS ANSWERS

QUESTIONS ABOUT WATER RATE LEGISLATION FOR REPRESENTATIVE CHUCK MCGRADY---AND HIS ANSWERS

"HENDERSON COUNTY (COMMISSIONERS) WOULD HAVE LIKED ME TO FORCE A REGIONAL WATER AUTHORITY ON HENDERSONVILLE.  I DIDN'T DO THAT."---CHUCK MCGRADY   

The way we (at WHKP) see it, you can’t get much farther apart than this: Henderson County Commissioner Bill Lapsley sees it as “a major step forward”. Members of Hendersonville City Council call it “a kick in the teeth.”

Chuck McGrady’s water bill, which he created at the urging of county commissioners and Lapsley in particular, if approved by the state house and senate and signed into law by the governor, and if it survives a probable court challenge which in the case of Ashville similar legislation did not, would force the city, which has owned and operated its water system for about a century, to apply to the North Carolina Local Government Commission for approval of any rate increase for water customers outside the city limits.

The Local Government Commission is made up of the Secretary of Revenue, State Treasurer, State Auditor, Secretary of State---and five voting appointees of the governor and the General Assembly.

It is our understanding that, under Rep. McGrady’s bill, if approved, this would apply statewide to every municipal water system in North Carolina.

Most county residents, businesses, and industries who pay a monthly water bill to the city have not seen, and likely will not see, the actual legislation that would take away a century’s worth of rate setting authority from the locally elected mayor and city council and from the water department that the citizens, residents, and taxpayers of Hendersonville own and hold title to. And there are more questions than answers coming from the public about the “why, what, who, where, when, and how” of this legislation that could forever change what they pay for water every month and who will make that decision.

For that reason, we sent some of the questions we’re hearing from the public to Rep. McGrady this week and he promptly responded with answers. Here is that e-mail exchange:

1)How is a state agency (appointed 400 miles away, not elected) as
> remote to "the people" as the LGC (or the utilities commission) any
> more accountable, or accessible, to water customers in Henderson
> County, outside or inside the city, than what we have now...which is
> at least LOCAL access to the elected city council?

Chuck: The LGC is part of the Treasurer’s Office, and the Treasurer is elected. While water customers hopefully will still go first to Hendersonville to resolve any issues, but they will now have somewhere else to go—they can go to another entity that might not have the viewpoint that the city has about its own system or whatever the issue is. Again, there is nothing to keep water customers from going to Hendersonville, but there is now oversight.
>
> 2)Is it not likely that a whole new regulatory process like this will
> at least slow down, if not curtail, expansion of municipal water lines
> to industries, businesses, and neighborhoods outside the city?

Chuck: No. This is “light oversight.” The Local Government Commission is not going to be making day-to-day decisions about expanding lines to schools or new industries. However, charging differential rates will be something that will need approval.
>
> 3)What evidence is there that Hendersonville has been using ANY water
> department money, particularly revenue from water customers outside
> the city, inappropriately?

Chuck: Right now? None. In the past, everyone knows that is how cities ran. Look at the 2003 of the NC Court of Appeals which documented Asheville’s case. People might be surprised to find out how much of the city manager’s salary is allocated from the enterprise funds, though.

>> 4Is it not possible or even likely...that a whole new level of
> approval and regulation like this will slow down, even discourage,
> water department from doing beneficial things outside their municipal
> limits...like water lines to those with contaminated wells in Dana or
> to make a new industry like Trihistil in Mills River possible?

Chuck: No.
>
> 5)Exactly what IS the process the city will have to go through to
> increase rates out in the county? Will this involve public hearings,
> and if so, where? Can the city appeal an LGC decision, and if so, how
> and to whom?

Chuck: They will have to petition the Local Government Commission for approval of differential rates.
>
> 6)Water and sewer are the biggest issues for job-creating industries,
> that are far more concerned with access than with rates...will this
> new level of bureaucracy (approval and regulation)---on the state
> level---not be harmful to growth and the recruitment of job creators?

Chuck: No
>
> 7)When all is said and done, how is the public (water customers) going
> to be any better served, or better protected, when what we'll be left
> with is a whole new (and very remote and unaccountable) level of
> bureaucracy, approval, and regulation...that can still be lobbied
> which in the end will likely give the "good ole boys" in power (i.e.
> the utilities commission and Duke Energy) pretty much whatever they
> want?

Chuck: 70% of the customers are not residents of Hendersonville. Thus, they don’t have the option that I have if I’m dissatisfied with something with my water. I can vote for a new mayor or council. What do the other 70% do? If they received their water from a private water provider, they could go to the Utilities Commission if they had a complaint. However, they have no ability to influence any decisions about water now.
>
>8)Frankly, this is looking more and more like the way Nancy Pelosi described Obamacare: "We'll have to pass this bill in order to
> find out what's in it.”

Chuck: Larry, you are usually one who has a long term perspective and shows lots of common sense. You don’t seem to remember a time, not that long ago, when Hendersonville was doing all sorts of bad things. Now Hendersonville has been good for awhile, partly because of change of leadership and good city manager and partly because of the threat of legislative action. It isn’t an accident that their differential rates have come down in relation to their other rates. They came down between then Sen Apodaca and I told them that they better adjust them or they’d find themselves as part of a regional water and sewer authority. What I’m trying to do to make sure we don’t go back to the old ways of doing things when the legislature isn’t watching.

Henderson County would have liked me to force a regional water authority on Hendersonville. I didn’t do that. Henderson County proposed that I put water systems like Hendersonville’s under the Utilities Commission, and have the Commission approve things in the same way that a private water company is regulated. I didn’t do that. I chose “soft” regulation or oversight of the LGC of the “hard” regulation that I could have easily provided under the Utilities Commission.

The same questions were "copied" to State Senator Chuck Edwards.  Here's his response:

Sen. Chuck Edwards
11:23 AM (16 hours ago)

to me
Larry, All of these are good questions that I am thoroughly exploring before taking a position.

CHUCK EDWARDS, SENATOR
NC 48th District; Henderson, Transylvania, South Buncombe Counties
(919) 733-5745 Raleigh Office
(828) 785-4177 District Office
www.NC48.com

Questions and notes by WHKP News Director Larry Freeman

 

i

LOCAL DOGWOOD AND APPLE TREES IN BLOOM---TAKE A SELF-GUIDED TOUR

LOCAL DOGWOOD AND APPLE TREES IN BLOOM---TAKE A SELF-GUIDED TOUR

MAPS AVAILABLE AT THE VISITOR'S CENTER

The apple blossoms throughout Henderson County are in full bloom this week. The apple trees produce gorgeous delicate spring blossoms waiting on bees for pollination to produce some of the best apples in Western North Carolina. The apple blossom varies in color according to the type of apple tree and is best recognized as white or pink.

The blooming season is a critical time to determine the size of the fall apple harvest. A driving tour of apple orchards is the perfect way to spend a beautiful spring afternoon.

Enjoy a self-guided driving tour in and around Henderson County's apple country view the orchards in bloom. After the blossoms disappear it takes from 100 to 200 days to reach harvest depending upon the variety. The Henderson County apple harvest season runs from late-August through mid-October. Three self-guided driving tours are available of the apple country, ranging from 7.5 to 25 miles’ long

North Carolina is the 7th largest apple-producing state in the nation and Henderson County is the largest apple-producing county in North Carolina and grows 85 percent of the apples in the state. Henderson County is home to approximately 106 apple growers with an estimate of 1 million producing trees. According to Henderson County Extension Service and Agribusiness Henderson County statistics, there are about 4,000 acres of apple trees planted in Henderson County.

Peaking right behind the apple trees are the flowering dogwood trees, state flower of North Carolina. The popular dogwood tree is native to eastern parts of North America. There are several varieties of the dogwood tree, some varieties are pink in color but most found primarily in the wild are white.

The Dogwood Trail, self-guided driving tour is 23 miles of beautiful spring blossoms, historic sites and lovely neighborhoods. The optimum time of year to view the dogwood trees is mid-April

Both tour maps are available at the Visitors Center, located at 201 South Main Street in Hendersonville or online at www.visithendersonvillenc.org
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SCAMMERS ARE CALLING TELLING LOCAL PEOPLE THEY'VE MISSED JURY DUTY

SCAMMERS ARE CALLING TELLING LOCAL PEOPLE THEY'VE MISSED JURY DUTY

AND THEY MUST PAY TO AVOID ARREST     

The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office has received multiple calls from concerned citizens reporting a potential scam. The scammer identifies himself as a high ranking member of the Sheriff’s Office. The potential victims are told they missed jury duty and need to purchase pre-paid cards to avoid arrest. The scammer tries to legitimize this by telling people to bring their pre-paid cards to the Sheriff’s Office parking lot to make payment.

Henderson County Sheriff Charles McDonald says, “The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office does not make phone calls of this nature regarding missed jury duty and will never request any type of payment by prepaid visa or Green Dot card.”

Fortunately, the Sheriff’s Office has not taken any reports of residents falling victim to this scam. If you receive this type of call, please hang up and do not give out any personal information.

A MAJOR RE-MODELING IS COMING TO HENDERSONVILLE'S ALDI'S FOOD STORE THIS SUMMER

A MAJOR RE-MODELING IS COMING TO HENDERSONVILLE'S ALDI'S FOOD STORE THIS SUMMER

WHILE A LOT IS HAPPENING WITH GROCERY STORES ON HENDERSONVILLE'S SOUTH SIDE, WITH THE NEW AND LARGER INGLES ALL SET TO OPEN AND WHILE CONSTRUCTION IS CLEARED TO GET UNDERWAY FOR THE NEW PUBLIX STORE, AND WHILE FOOD LION IS APPARENTLY DISAPPEARING FROM HENDERSON COUNTY, SOME THINGS ARE HAPPENING WITH ANOTHER FOOD STORE IN THIS AREA.   

WHKP NEWS RECENTLY CONDUCTED AN ON-LINE INTERVIEW WITH THOM BEHTZ, WHO IS VICE PRESIDENT OF ALDI'S JEFFERSON DIVISION...AND HE CONFIRMED THAT THE DUNCAN HILL ROAD STORE IS SET FOR A MAKE-OVER THIS SUMMER AS PART OF THE COMPANY'S $1.6 BILLION EXPANSION.  THIS WILL RESULT IN AN ALL NEW LOOK FOR THE HENDERSONVILLE ALDI'S STORE AND A SIGNIFICANT INCREASE IN SALES FLOOR SPACE.  ALDI'S VICE PRESIDENT BEHTZ RESPONDED TO QUESTIONS FROM WHKP NEWS DIRECTOR LARRY FREEMAN:   

Q: I understand there are plans to remodel the Hendersonville store. When will this take place and what will the remodel involve?

A: Thank you for your interest in ALDI! The Hendersonville store, located at 110 Duncan Hill Road, is scheduled to be remodeled this summer, as part of our $1.6 billion nationwide plan to expand and remodel more than 1,300 US stores by 2020. The remodeled store will be approximately 17,597 square feet with about 12,065 square feet and five aisles of sales floor space. The store currently is approximately 17,239 square feet with about 9,561 square feet of sales floor space.

The new look of our Hendersonville store will deliver on our customers’ desire for a modern and convenient shopping experience with a focus on fresh items, including more robust produce, dairy and bakery sections and more room for customers’ favorite products like organics, gluten-free foods and premium baby items. Remodeled stores will also feature a modern design, open ceilings, natural lighting and environmentally-friendly building materials – such as recycled materials, energy-saving refrigeration and LED lighting.

Q: Are there any new ALDI stores planned for western North Carolina? If so, where and when?
A: While we do not have immediate plans to open new stores in western North Carolina, we do plan to remodel the Asheville store located at 1344 Patton Avenue in early fall. We will be in touch with more specific details as they become available.

Q: How successfully does ALDI compete with larger food stores in the area like Ingles and Harris-Teeter?
A: The grocery retail industry is a very competitive marketplace and, while we certainly track our competitive set, we know that competitors come and go. For more than 40 years ALDI has focused on what we do best, delivering fresh, affordable premium groceries to our customers every day. A great part of our success has been and will continue to be our ability to evolve with our customers. That’s one of the reasons we’re making this significant investment in remodeling more than 1,300 stores across the country. It will allow us to make more room for our customers’ favorite products, including organic produce, our liveGfree gluten-free line, the SimplyNature line of products free from more than 125 artificial ingredients and preservatives, and our line of Little Journey baby products. People wouldn’t keep coming back and we wouldn’t be growing the way we are if we didn’t have exceptional products. Our unique combination of high-quality groceries at everyday low prices truly sets us apart.

Questions for and answers from Thom Behtz, Vice POresident, Aldi's

 

 

MEADOWS PREDICTS REAL OBAMACARE REFORM SOON:  "WE ARE VERY CLOSE."; GIVES TRUMP AN "A" GRADE

MEADOWS PREDICTS REAL OBAMACARE REFORM SOON: "WE ARE VERY CLOSE."; GIVES TRUMP AN "A" GRADE

ACCOMPANIES BY A NATIONAL POLITICAL REPORTER FOR "USA TODAY" AND AFTER GIVING PRESIDENT TRUMP AN "A-PLUS" FOR HIS FIRST 100 DAYS IN OFFICE, CONGRESSMAN MARK MEADOWS TOLD A WHKP RADIO AUDIENCE TUESDAY MORNING THAT WE CAN EXPECT TO SEE REAL REPEAL AND REFORM OF OBAMACARE VERY SOON.  "WE ARE VERY CLOSE", SAID MEADOWS...SPEAKING OF HEALTH CARE REFORM NEGOTIATIONS BY THE CONGRESS AND THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION.  MEADOWS EMPHHASIZED THESE WILL BE REAL REFORMS THAT LOWER MONTHLY PREMIUMS, CO-PAYS, AND DEDUCTIBLES.  "WITHOUT LOWER PREIUMS, WE WILL HAVE FAILED", SAID MEADOWS.   

MEADOWS SPOKE WITH WHKP NEWS DIRECTOR LARRY FREEMAN IN AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW SHOW ON WHKP TUESDAY MORNING AFTER BEING INUNDATED WITH OVER 600 INTERVIEW REQUESTS--MOST RELATED TO HIS ROLE AS CHAIR OF THE "FREEDOM CAUCUS" .  AS FOR THE NEW FEDERAL BUDGET, MEADOWS SAID THERE WILL BE NO GOVERNMENT "SHUT DOWN" THIS SPRING.   

MEADOWS ALSO COVERED IMMIGRATION REFORM, SYRIAN AIR STRIKS, WHITE HOUSE LEAKS, AND A WHOLE LOT MORE IN THE INTERVIEW...THAT CAN BE HEARD ON WHKP'S PODCASTS AT WHKP.COM (FEATURED AUDIO) AND AGAIN THIS SATURDAY MORNING AT 8:05 AND SUNDAY MORNING AT 10:05 ON WHKP AM AND FM AND WHKP.COM.   

BACK IN WESTERN NORTHG CAROLINA FOR CONGRESSE'S EASTER RECESS, MEADOWS MET WITH A CIVICS CLASS AT EAST HENDERSON HIGH SCHOOL AND TOURED THE LOCAL SELEE CORPORATION AND AFTER THE WHKP INTERVIEW TUESDAY MORNING, MEADOWS PARTICIPATED IN AN OPIOD EPIDEMIC ROUNDTABLE (IN THE PHOTO) HOSTED BY HENDERSON COUNTY SHERIFF CHARLIE MCDONALD:    

On Tuesday, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) joined NC11 Sheriffs and local law enforcement professionals for a roundtable to discuss the growing opioid problem in Western North Carolina.

Current studies show that an average of four North Carolinians die from a medication or drug overdose every day. Additionally, an April 2016 study notes that of the worst cities in America for opioid abuse, North Carolina contains 4 of the top 20 cities. The growing concern around these figures led Congressman Meadows and law enforcement officials to discuss solutions over a meeting in Western North Carolina.

“The professionals closest to the problem are often the most well equipped to lead the charge in fixing it,” Rep. Meadows said, “and I truly believe Western North Carolina has the best law enforcement officials in the country. The opioid epidemic in our community is substantial, but we are committed to bringing the situation under control and today’s meeting was a crucial step. I want to thank our NC11 law enforcement officers for their eager willingness to discuss the issue and for their always steadfast leadership in our community.”

Henderson County Sheriff Charles McDonald released the following statement after the meeting:

"I am heartened to see the willingness among the Sheriffs and Chiefs of Police within the 11th District to lay aside jurisdictional and organizational boundaries to address the opioid epidemic plaguing western North Carolina. It is this type of interoganizational cooperation that will be needed to win the fight we are in. We all would also like to thank Congressman Mark Meadows for his leadership and support for law enforcement across our region."

MCGRADY'S BILL INTRODUCED ON MONDAY WOULD PLACE "DIFFERENTIAL" WATER RATES UNDER THE CONTROL OF A STATE AGENCY

MCGRADY'S BILL INTRODUCED ON MONDAY WOULD PLACE "DIFFERENTIAL" WATER RATES UNDER THE CONTROL OF A STATE AGENCY

WATER RATES CHARGED TO CUSTOMERS WHO LIVE OUTSIDE THE CITY   

With the deadline getting close for introducing bills in this year’s session of the North Carolina General Assembly, State Representative Chuck McGrady on Monday introduced legislation, if passed by both the state house and senate and signed into law by the governor, would require the City of Hendersonvilleto get the approval of the North Carolina Local Government Commission before charging higher rates for water customers outsides the city.

This is not the legislation requested a while back by county commissioners at the urging of commissioner Bill Lapsley that would have taken control of the city-owned water system away and placed it under the North Carolina Utilities Commission. That would have been what McGrady calls “hard over-sight”. This legislation applies to municipal water systems statewide and McGrady refers to it as “soft over-sight”.

McGrady said what he introduced Monday is not a “take it or leave it” bill, that he is still open to input and is willing to make changes that he says make sense, but he emphasizes he is sticking by his position of restricting what’s called “differential” rates for customers outside the town limits of the municipality that owns the water system. McGrady said Monday, “I do intend to move the bill.”

In a three to one vote earlier this year, county commissioners, after a lengthy presentation by commissioner Lapsley, a former water department employee, passed a resolution asking that control of the city’s water system be taken away from the city. Rather than putting control under the Utilities Commission’s seven members all appointed by the governor, McGrady’s bill would require approval from the LGC or state Local Government Commission before charging those “differential” rates. That state commission is made up of nine members including the state treasurer, state auditor, secretary of state, and secretary of revenue plus five members appointed by the governor and the General Assembly.

Hendersonville city officials have expressed strong opposition to having control of the city-owned water system taken away and placed under a state agency, and have also opposed having the city’s system placed under a joint city-county or regional water authority.