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LOCAL ROTARY SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS ANNOUNCED

LOCAL ROTARY SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS ANNOUNCED

ROTARY CLUB OF HENDERSONVILLE ANNOUNCES SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

The Rotary Club of Hendersonville has a long tradition of supporting education in Henderson County. The Rotary Scholarship Award is presented to two graduating Henderson County high school seniors and is selected by the Rotary Club of Hendersonville scholarship committee. Each awardee receives a renewable scholarship of $2,000 per year up to four years.

It is based on demonstrated academic achievement, financial need and participation and leadership in community based volunteer projects. The recipients will be required to attend no less than one meeting annually and update the club on their college experiences. Students must continue to attend college classes and maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).

This year’s recipients are: Annabelle Cram, East Henderson High School, will be attending Cornell University and Meghan Reid, Hendersonville High School, will be attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

“We hope this Rotary Scholarship Award will provide the assistance and opportunity for these students to further their education at an institution of higher learning of their choice” states Bradley Jones, Chairman of the Scholarship Committee.

The Rotary Club of Hendersonville has been supporting education through scholarship awards for over 26 years. Funds for these scholarships are raised from special events held throughout the year including: Golf Tournament, Lucky Ducky Drop, Pancake Breakfast and Sponsorships from corporate and private partners.

Rotary is an organization of business and professional leaders united worldwide who provide humanitarian services, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations and advance goodwill and peace around the world. There are 34,282 member clubs in over 200 countries worldwide with 1.2 million club members.

The Rotary Club of Hendersonville was formed in 1927 and meets every Tuesday at noon at the Chariot. There are over 140 members of the club.

WELCOME SUMMER---IT BEGINS AT 12:24 AM THIS WEDNESDAY MORNING

WELCOME SUMMER---IT BEGINS AT 12:24 AM THIS WEDNESDAY MORNING

SUMMER OFFICIALLY BEGINS IN HENDERSONVILLE WITH THE "SUMMER SOLSTICE" AT 12:24 AM THIS WEDNESDAY   

WHEN IS THE SUMMER SOLSTICE 2017?
In 2017, the summer solstice falls on Wednesday, June 21, at 12:24 A.M. EDT.
Due to time zones, this means the solstice falls on Tuesday, June 20 in CDT, MDT, and PDT as below:
Wednesday, June 21, 12:24 A.M. EDT
Tuesday, June 20, 11:24 P.M. CDT
Tuesday, June 20, 10:24 P.M. MDT
Tuesday, June 20, 9:24 P.M. PDT
Note: this is only the “summer” solstice in the Northern Hemisphere. (Our Almanac is published in North America.) It is the winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere.

SUMMER SOLSTICE DATES
Year Summer Solstice (Northern Hemisphere)
2017 Wednesday, June 21
2018 Thursday, June 21
2019 Friday, June 21

WHAT IS THE SUMMER SOLSTICE?
The timing of the solstice depends on when the Sun reaches its northernmost point from the equator.
The word solstice is from the Latin solstitium, from sol (sun) and stitium (to stop), reflecting the fact that the Sun appears to stop at this time (and again at the winter solstice).
In temperate regions, we notice that the Sun is higher in the sky throughout the day, and its rays strike Earth at a more direct angle, causing the efficient warming we call summer.
This summer solstice is the day with the most hours of sunlight during the whole year. See our handy sunrise and sunset calculator for how many hours of sunlight you get in your location.
At the winter solstice, just the opposite occurs: The Sun is at its southernmost point and is low in the sky. Its rays hit the Northern Hemisphere at an oblique angle, creating the feeble winter sunlight.

WHY DOESN’T THE SUMMER SOLSTICE FALL ON THE SAME DATE EACH YEAR?
The summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere ranges in date from June 20 to 22. This occurs in part because of the difference between the Gregorian calendar system, which normally has 365 days, and the tropical year (how long it takes Earth to orbit the Sun once), which has about 365.242199 days. To compensate for the missing fraction of days, the Gregorian calendar adds a leap day about every 4 years, which makes the date for summer jump backward. However, the date also changes because of other influences, such as the gravitational pull from the Moon and planets, as well as the slight wobble in Earth’s rotation.

DID YOU KNOW?
Question: Why isn’t the summer solstice—the longest day of the year—also the hottest day of the year?
Answer: Earth’s atmosphere, land, and oceans absorb part of the incoming energy from the Sun and store it, releasing it back as heat at various rates. Water is slower to heat (or cool) than air or land. At the summer solstice, the Northern Hemisphere receives the most energy (highest intensity) from the Sun due to the angle of sunlight and day length. However, the land and oceans are still relatively cool, due to spring’s temperatures, so the maximum heating effect on air temperature is not felt just yet. Eventually, the land and, especially, oceans will release stored heat from the summer solstice back into the atmosphere. This usually results in the year’s hottest temperatures appearing in late July, August, or later, depending on latitude and other factors. This effect is called seasonal temperature lag.
Question: What is Midsummer Day (June 24)?
Answer: Around the time of the summer solstice, this day was the midpoint of the growing season, halfway between planting and harvest. Read more about the ancient Quarter Days!

SEASONS ON OTHER PLANETS
Mercury has virtually no tilt (less than ⅓0th of a degree) relative to the plane of its orbit, and therefore does not experience true seasons.
Uranus is tilted by almost 98 degrees and has seasons that last 21 years.
fire-in-sky_0.jpg

FUN FACTS
In Sweden, people celebrate the Summer Solstice by eating the first strawberries of the season.
In ancient Egypt, summer was the start of the new year. The rising of the star Sirius roughly coincided with the summer solstice and the annual flooding of the Nile River.

SUMMER SOLSTICE FOLKLORE
Deep snow in winter, tall grain in summer. –Estonian proverb
When the summer birds take their flight, goes the summer with them.
If it rains on Midsummer’s Eve, the filbert crops will be spoiled. –Unknown
One swallow never made a summer.
Easterly winds from May 19 to the 21 indicate a dry summer.
If there are many falling stars during a clear summer evening, expect thunder. If there are none, expect fine weather.

FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC   

 

TWO TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY TEENAGERS KILLED IN SUNDAY NIGHT TRUCK WRECK

TWO TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY TEENAGERS KILLED IN SUNDAY NIGHT TRUCK WRECK

On Monday morning the Highway Patrol confirmed a Transylvania County wreck Sunday night has claimed the lives of two teenagers.
They have been identified as Cole Owens and Austin Rhoden, both only 15 years old.

News 13 is reporting thatt Austin Rhoden was a rising Brevard High School 9th-grader who had just finished 8th grade at Brevard Middle, and Cole Owen was a rising 10th-grader who had just completed 9th grade at Rosman High.
The wreck happened along Tanasee Gap Road in Balsam Grove, and shut down the road in both directions near Sandy Branch Road until after midnight.

Troopers say the driver of a Toyota pickup was speeding when he entered a curve, lost control, overcorrected and overturned.
Five people were in the truck: two in the cab and three in the bed.

Cole Owens was the front passenger and was not wearing a seatbelt. Austin Rhoden was in the bed and was thrown out when the vehicle overturned.
Troopers told News 13 it was a single-vehicle accident that happened at about 8 p.m. Sunday.

This incident is still under investigation.

LOCAL UNITED WAY IS INVESTING $1.5 MILLION IN THE COMMUNITY

LOCAL UNITED WAY IS INVESTING $1.5 MILLION IN THE COMMUNITY

United Way to Invest $1.53 Million back into Community
The Board of Directors of United Way of Henderson County approved a total community investment of $1.53 million for the 2017/18 fiscal year. This investment includes grants to 44 Henderson County health and human service programs at 26 agencies working to advance the common good by improving education, income, and health throughout our community, and assisting those in need with basic needs and access to crisis services.

"We are proud to be a part of the excellent work that our many partners are doing here in Henderson County," said Denise Cumbee Long, Executive Director. "Our goal is to change systems and improve conditions that make our community a better place for everyone to live."

The $1.53 million total community investment includes grant awards to funded agencies, designations from donors, and Board directed grants and initiatives, as well as funding support for 2-1-1, Rising Leaders, volunteer initiatives, Charity Tracker, and other programs benefiting the residents of our local community.

MAKING BEAUTIFUL MUSIC FOR "THE FREE CLINICS"

MAKING BEAUTIFUL MUSIC FOR "THE FREE CLINICS"

AN AFTERNOON OF BEAUTIFUL MUIC FOR A GREAT LOCAL CAUSE   

The Free Clinics will be the beneficiary of profits from the June 24 Asheville Lyric Opera’s Summer Young Artists Concert, presented by the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Hendersonville (UUFH), 2021 Kanuga Road at Price Street in Hendersonville.

Suggested donation is $15 and tickets may be purchased at the door. The concert starts at 3:00 p.m. and the doors open at 2:30 p.m. Refreshments will be available at intermission. 10% of the concert profits will support The Free Clinics.

These young artists have participated in the Asheville Lyric Opera’s (ALO) Summer Young Artist Program. They will perform a collection of opera highlights, art songs and classical pieces they have worked on during the program. The young performers come to Asheville from around the country and participate in an intensive program for six weeks to develop their singing, acting, dancing and performing skills. They range from young professionals to students and they participate in ALO’s summer productions and perform extensively around the Western North Carolina. The June 24 concert at the UUFH is part of this performance series.

For more information about Asheville Lyric Opera Young Artists Concert at the UUFH, or to make reservations, please call 828.693.3157 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. State your name and the number of tickets needed and your reserved tickets will be available at the door.

The Free Clinics was established in 2001 and enhances the healthcare system in Henderson and Polk Counties to ensure the accessibility of quality healthcare for uninsured, low-income clients. The Free Clinics works with volunteers and partnering healthcare providers to provide healthcare, prevention, education, medication access, and case management services, including specialty referrals.

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SHERIFF SAYS:  "OPERATION OFFENDER BLITZ" A SUCCESS

SHERIFF SAYS: "OPERATION OFFENDER BLITZ" A SUCCESS

KEEPING REGISTERED SEX OFFENDERS IN COMPLIANCE   

Operation Offender Blitz was a success for the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office. Registered Sex Offender compliance checks were conducted by a Joint Multi-Agency Task Force from members of the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office, North Carolina Department of Public Safety, Department of Homeland Security and the US Marshal’s Office. Agencies involved were conducting residential verification checks as the sun began to rise in the early morning hours of June 8, 2017. The operation lasted through the late afternoon.

Seventeen members from various agencies came together last week where they were briefed on Operation Offender Blitz by Henderson County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Steve Owen.

Deputy Owen laid out the mission’s objective and operations plan. “This mission is to ensure that those currently registered in our county are in full compliance with North Carolina General Statutes pertaining to the Sex Offender Registry (SOR),” he said to members of the task force. Several teams were formed with members from each agency. Each were given assignments at various locations throughout the county to conduct the residential verification checks.

“Our goal is to ensure that the 124 registered sex offenders currently in Henderson County remain in compliance,” said Sheriff Charles McDonald. “If they decide not to, we will handle each case accordingly and work with the District Attorney’s office to prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law.”

The Sheriff’s Office wants the community to know they are doing their due diligence in accordance with state laws and to educate both offenders and local residents. Any offender who has a reportable conviction and who resides in North Carolina, moves to North Carolina, or is a non-resident student or worker in North Carolina must maintain registration in accordance with current laws.

Residential restrictions are also enforced where registered sex offenders are generally prohibited from living, such as within 1,000 feet of a public or non-public school or childcare center or within 300 feet of any place intended primarily for the use, care or supervision of minors. Such locations include but are not limited to schools, children’s museums, child care centers, nurseries, playgrounds or any place where minors frequently congregate, including libraries, arcades, amusement parks, recreation parks and swimming pools when minors are present. The State Fairgrounds are also prohibited during the period of time each year when the State Fair or North Carolina Mountain State Fair is conducted.

Registered offenders must comply with state laws pertaining to registry and the Henderson County Sheriff’s Office strives to hold offenders accountable if they violate such laws. Offenders must report where they are residing, employed or attending institutions of higher education and must report all online identifiers. Furthermore, offenders are banned from accessing commercial networking sites that accept minor children as members or allow children to create or maintain personal web pages on the commercial social networking websites.

North Carolina Sex Offenders must maintain registration requirements for a minimum of 30 years. During criminal sentencing, a court order is required before certain sex offenders are classified. Certain offenders not classified as recidivists, aggravated offenders or sexually violent predators may petition for removal after being registered in North Carolina for ten (10) years and must petition the Superior Court where the offender was convicted in North Carolina. If an offender meets the criteria specified in NCGS 14-208.12A, then the court in its discretion may terminate the requirements to register.

Compliance checks by the Sheriff’s Office are conducted regularly throughout the year. It is not unusual for the offenders to see deputies knocking on their door or leaving some sort of notification of their presence. However, utilizing the services offered from both state and federal agencies made Operation Offender Blitz a successful team effort by all involved.

All of the registered sex offenders where residential checks were conducted in Henderson County were in compliance with state regulations. The following arrests were made on unrelated charges during Thursday’s operation:

· Anthony Wade Hollifield, age 45 of 29 N Holly Ln. in Fletcher, was charged with felony possession of methamphetamine, felony maintaining veh/dwell/place of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Hollifield was held in the Henderson County Jail and was released after posting an $18,500.00 secured bond.

· Sheila Marie Woodham, age 43 of 29 N Holly Ln. in Fletcher, was charged with misdemeanor simple possession of schedule IV controlled substance and misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia. Woodham was held in the Henderson County Jail and was released after posting a $600.00 secured bond.

· Timothy Ian Matthews, age 34 of 120 Timberland Dr. in Etowah, was taken into custody for an outstanding warrant for misdemeanor larceny. Matthews was held at the Henderson County Jail and was released after posting a $500.00 secured bond.

A listing of Henderson County’s 124 registered sex offenders can be found at sexoffender.ncsbi.gov

TWO REMOVED FROM LOCAL YOUTH SPORTS; BANNED FROM JACKSON PARK

TWO REMOVED FROM LOCAL YOUTH SPORTS; BANNED FROM JACKSON PARK

SOFTBALL AND BASEBALL PROGRAMS ARE SEPARATE FROM THE COUNTY...THEY LEASE THE FIELDS   

Two men involved in Henderson County youth sports programs have been removed from their positions and banned from Henderson County parks for a year following their arrests.
According to an arrest warrant, Randy Patterson, the former president for Henderson County Youth Baseball, punched a man in the face four times, breaking his glasses and then bit him on the back on June 8.
He's charged with assault and battery and injury to personal property.

According to another arrest warrant, Steven Riddle, a former coach with Henderson County Youth Softball, threatened a board member in a text message
.
Tim Hopkin is the director for Henderson County Parks and Rec.
He said the softball and baseball programs are separate entities from the county and govern themselves. They lease the fields from the county.

Hopkins told News 13, "We have a zero-tolerance policy, and we're very happy that we have the sheriff's department and deputies at work in our facilities and they're able to swiftly and efficiently and appropriately handle the situations when they do arise on our park systems," he said.

SHERIFF ANNOUNCES MILLS RIVER ARMED ROBBERY ARRESTS

SHERIFF ANNOUNCES MILLS RIVER ARMED ROBBERY ARRESTS

ARMED ROBBERY ARRESTS   
June 14, 2017

The Henderson County Sheriff’s Office has made arrests following an armed robbery that occurred in the Mills River area on May 11, 2017.

Michael Caldwell Angram, age 29 of 93 Harris St. in Hendersonville, was arrested on June 2, 2017, and charged with felony robbery with a dangerous weapon and felony conspiracy to commit robbery with a dangerous weapon. Michael Angram is being held in the Henderson County Jail under an $80,000.00 secured bond.

Samuel Nathaniel Angram III, age 26 of 31 Talley Dr. in Fletcher, was arrested on June 5, 2017, and charged with felony robbery with a dangerous weapon and felony conspiracy to commit robbery with a dangerous weapon. Samuel Angram III was held in the Henderson County Jail and released under a $5,000.00 secured bond.

Christina Leigh Robinson, age 24 of 10 Adair Court in Arden, was arrested on June 5, 2017, and charged with felony robbery with a dangerous weapon and felony conspiracy to commit robbery with a dangerous weapon. Christina Robinson was held in the Henderson County Jail and released under a $5,000.00 secured bond.

LOCAL PRO GOLFER TOMMY TOLLES QUALIFIES FOR THE U.S. SENIOR OPEN

LOCAL PRO GOLFER TOMMY TOLLES QUALIFIES FOR THE U.S. SENIOR OPEN

SPORTS   

Henderson County,and former PGA golfer Tommy Tolles has qualified for the U.S. Senior Open tournament in Peabody Mass June 29-July 2nd.

Tolles became a qualifier at Starmount Forest Country Club in Greensboro Monday shooting a 6 under par 65.

Tolles and his team that consisted of Richard Rhodes an d K-Dog were recent winners of the first annual Mickey Marvin Scholarship Tournament last October played at the Hendersonville Country Club.

NEW MOUNTAIN MUSIC DOCUMENTARY PREMIERS THIS MONTH

NEW MOUNTAIN MUSIC DOCUMENTARY PREMIERS THIS MONTH

A GREAT AMERICAN TAPESTRY, THE MANY STRANDS OF MOUNTAIN MUSIC   

The Center for Cultural Preservation is pleased to announce the world premiere of David Weintraub’s new film on the history of Appalachian Music titled, A Great American Tapestry, The Many Strands of Mountain Music screening at three venues in WNC in June. The documentary tells the story of the southern mountain’s musical birth and evolution through the strands of the Scots-Irish legacy, oft-overlooked African-American tradition and through the longest lived music in the Americas, the indigenous tradition.

According to Director/Producer David Weintraub, “Mountain music is often discussed as a Scots-Irish tradition that came over here by the Ulster-Scots and that’s true. It is a fascinating story. But what often gets overlooked is that the West African banjo was played in this country by blacks for nearly 100 years before it was ever picked up by white musicians. African-Americans also played a key role in developing the syncopated and rhythmic fiddle styles that symbolic of old time and bluegrass music. The blended cultural result is exactly what makes mountain music as beautiful and captivating as it is.”

The film features the leading luminaries of the ballad tradition including balladeer extraordinaires Sheila Kay Adams, Joe Penland and Bobby McMillon as well as Grammy Award winning founders of the world renowned black string band, the Carolina Chocolate Drops including Rhiannon Giddens, members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, David Holt, and musicologists and historians who tell the story of the great melting pot that became Appalachian music.

According to Phil Jamison, professor of Appalachian Music at Warren Wilson College and a participant in the film, “The reality of the southern backcountry was a diverse mix of Europeans, African-American and indigenous native peoples. Not racially, culturally or economically homogeneous, it was home to wealthy landowners, poor tenant farmers, sharecroppers, merchants, subsistence farms and enslaved African-Americans.” All of them shaped the music and made it special.

In addition to a film screening, several musicians participating in the film will perform at the start of each program. A brief discussion with the filmmaker and participants follows the screenings. Hendersonville’s world premiere will feature performances by Sheila Kay Adams, local old time band Rhiannon and the Relics and rising star Amythyst Kiah.

The world premiere of A Great American Tapestry will be held at the following locations/date/times:
Blue Ridge Community College, Bo Thomas Auditorium at 7:00 pm on Thursday, June 22nd
Fine Arts Theatre, Asheville at 7:30 pm on Thursday, June 29th
White Horse, Black Mountain at 7:30 pm on Saturday, June 30th
Tickets are $10 and $15.

Tickets are expected to sell out quickly so it is highly recommended that they be ordered soon on the Center for Cultural Preservation’s website at saveculture.org. For more information about the program and for group sales call the Center at (828) 692-8062.
For more information about future film screenings, online purchases of the DVD and more information about the film, contact the Center for Cultural Preservation at (828) 692-8062 or www.saveculture.org.